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Ida (2014 Sundance capsule)

February 2, 2014  |  10:49am
<i>Ida</i> (2014 Sundance capsule)

Ida is a compelling examination of how the past shapes us, even when we don’t know anything about it. Pawel Pawlikowski’s quiet Polish film takes place in the 1960s, when World War II has ended, yet still has the power to grip people’s lives.

In the title role, Agata Trzebuchowska brings the perfect mixture of naiveté and curiosity to the part of a nun-in-training who learns that her family was Jewish and killed during Nazi occupation. She embarks on an odyssey to find their graves with her cynical, alcoholic aunt (Agata Kulesza), who used to be a prosecutor for the communist government. The relationship between the two characters grows more and more complex as they go deeper down the rabbit hole.

Shot in black-and-white and academy ratio (1.37:1), Ida uses its frame to distinct effect, often framing characters in the lower third of the screen (so much so that in a couple scenes, the subtitles have to go up above their heads). The effect can be unsettling, but intriguing. That space could contain the watchful power of Ida’s lord, but it could also be nothing more than an empty void. After a life of certitude, Ida has to decide for herself.

Director: Pawel Pawlikowski
Writers: Rebecca Lenkiewicz, Pawel Pawlikowski
Starring: Agata Kulesza, Agata Trzebuchowska, Halina Skoczynska, Dawid Ogrodnik
Production Details: Opus Film, 80 minutes

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