All the Movies and TV Leaving Netflix in June

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All the Movies and TV Leaving Netflix in June

Yesterday, we told you about all the new movies and TV coming to Netflix in June. But there must be balance in the Force. You win some, you lose some. And next month, you’ll be losing quite a few great movies from your streaming options. Here are our top seven picks for movies to watch before they’re gone, followed by a list of everything that’s leaving Netflix in June.

station-agent.jpg 1. The Station Agent
Year: 2003
Director: Thomas McCarthy
One of the early breakout roles for Game of ThronesPeter Dinklage was this warm, funny story of a reclusive man who moves into an abandoned train depot. Director Thomas McCarthy has made a career of caring deeply for his characters in films like The Visitor and Win Win, and here it’s to slowly convince Dinklage’s Finbar McBride that his low view of humanity might just be wrong. It’s a contemplative, tender, hilarious film that feels both real and uplifting. If only George R.R. Martin would give Tyrion this kind of break.—Josh Jackson


Groundhog1212.jpg 2. Groundhog Day
Year: 1993
Director: Harold Ramis
Bill Murray, director/co-writer Harold Ramis and screenwriter Danny Rubin take a Twilight Zone-esque comedic premise—a self-centered weatherman gets stuck experiencing February 2 again and again—and find unexpected profundity. A more conventional film would have love resolve the chronological predicament, but instead, it falls to Murray to become the best man he can possibly be. A Hollywood comedy that challenges middle-class Americans to better themselves, Groundhog Day doesn’t just elicit laughs, but leaves audiences more deeply moved than they ever expected.—Curt Holman


bridget-jones.jpg
3. Bridget Jones’s Diary
Year: 2001
Director: Sharon Maguire
Diehards may have been initially miffed at her casting, but Renée Zellweger was crucial to the movie’s success. She’s boundlessly charming as Bridget Jones, gaining 20 pounds to play the British singleton who falls for Hugh Grant and (eventually) Colin Firth. From her appalling bad public speeches to lip-synching to Sad FM songs in her pajamas, Zellweger carries the film on her (still slender) shoulders.—Jeremy Medina


sophies-choice.jpg 4. Sophie’s Choice
Year: 1982
Director: Alan J. Pakula
William Styron’s soul-shattering story of an ethereally beautiful concentration camp survivor is brought to life on screen by Meryl Streep. Streep learned to speak French with a Polish accent in order to preserve the integrity of one of the most important literary characters of the modern age. Alan Pakula allows Streep to do what she does best: She dons the character like a perfectly fitted coat. The result is one of the greatest film performances of all time. Sophie’s Choice is the embodiment of the horror of war and its aftermath.—Joan Radell


about-a-boy.jpg 5. About a Boy
Year: 2002
Directors: Chris Weitz, Paul Weitz
No stranger to romantic comedies, Hugh Grant delivered perhaps his best performance ever in About a Boy, a different kind of rom-com. Through his relationship with a young teenager, Grant subtly transforms from notorious womanizer into, well, a man capable of loving the beautiful Rachel Weisz. Grant’s relationship with the boy is tender and thoughtful, much like the film itself.—Jeremy Medina


mulan.jpg 6. Mulan
Year: 1998
Director: Tony Bancroft, Barry Cook
It seems like all of Eddie Murphy’s best comedic performances since Coming to America are animated. His little dragon Mushu is a sharp source of humor in this otherwise touching retelling of a Chinese folktale—a wonderful move by Disney to give its target market a strong heroine, whose bravery and sense of duty and honor is admirable. Gorgeously animated with rich, saturated colors, the 2-D film is populated by three-dimensional characters. And in a story about honor, the studio brings just the right Eastern touches to pay due respect to China’s history.—Josh Jackson


who-framed-roger-rabbit.jpg 7. Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Year: 1988
Director: Robert Zemeckis
Rating: PG
Bob Hoskyns is a P.I. charged with exonerating the titular Mr. Rabbit in a noir send-up to old-school animation. The 1940s world of Toontown is a place where toons and people intermingle, and Kathleen Turner voices Roger’s bombshell girlfriend Jessica Rabbit. This imaginative mix of live action and animation remains an original a quarter-century later.—Josh Jackson

All the Movies and TV Leaving Netflix in June

Leaving 6/1/16
A Wrinkle in Time (2003)
About a Boy (2002)
Bounce (2000)
Bridget Jones’s Diary (2001)
The Chronicles of Riddick: Dark Fury (2004)
Clear and Present Danger (1994)
Click (2006)
Darkman (1990)
Disney Animation Collection: Vol. 5: Wind in the Willows
Dude, Where’s My Car? (2000)
Duplex (2003)
Elias: Rescue Team Adventures: Season 1
The Faculty (1998)
Far from Home: The Adventures of Yellow Dog (1995)
Ghost (1990)
Groundhog Day (1993)
Hamlet (2000)
Hercules (1997)
In the Bedroom (2001)
Jersey Girl (2004)
Kinky Boots (2005)
Lassie (2005)
Losing Isaiah (1995)
Madonna: Truth or Dare (1991)
Marvin’s Room (1996)
Music of the Heart (1999)
My Boss’s Daughter (2003)
Nine Months (1995)
The Others (2001)
Paris Is Burning (1990)
Private Parts (1997)
Proof (2005)
Schoolhouse Rock!: Earth (2009)
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (2005)
The Station Agent (2003)
The Stepford Wives (2004)
Stir of Echoes (1999)
Stir of Echoes 2: The Homecoming (2007)
The Super Hero Squad Show: Seasons 1-2
Velvet Goldmine (1998)
View from the Top (2003)
Wayne’s World (1992)
The Yards (2000)

Leaving 6/2/16
Eureka Seven: Seasons 1-2

Leaving 6/14/16
HawthoRNe: Seasons 1-3

Leaving 6/15/16
The Bank Job (2008)

Leaving 6/18/16
A Late Quartet (2012)
The Wubbulous World of Dr. Seuss: Season 1

Leaving 6/21/16
Mixology: Season 1

Leaving 6/24/16
Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me (2013)
The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996)
The Hunchback of Notre Dame II (2002)
Marvel’s Avengers Assemble: Season 1
Mulan (1998)
Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

Leaving 6/30/16
Sophie’s Choice (1982)

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