"Bright Sun Bright Rain" by Magic Music

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Colorado-based legends Magic Music – dubbed the state’s first “jam band” – have a storied history that truly complements their name. Hailing from various cities around the United States, the group began as a merry troop of renegades whose brotherhood was eternally forged in the music they made. In 2014, Will Luckey, George Cahill, Chris Daniels, Tim Goodman, Tommy Major and Jimmy Haslip came together to make the first studio album for a band that was never a national household name in 1970. People still remember this first Colorado ‘jam band’ playing the 2nd and 3rd Telluride Bluegrass Festivals. They played shows in LA, New York, Nashville and all over the States with the likes of Cat Stevens, The Youngbloods, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Steve Martin and more. Bad record deals from major and independent labels came and went but only their reunions at their old manager Greg Sparr’s mountain house and a host of live radio show and two-track studio recordings kept the story alive.

About "Bright Sun Bright Rain"
Legend has it that the songwriters were hanging out on a hilltop and were visited by elves who were playing this song on flute, so the musicians learned it too. Gotta love the ‘70s in Colorado. The song was written by original members George “Tode” Cahill and the late Lynn “Flatbush” Poyer.

? 2016 Bright Sun Records, LLC
Released on: 2016-08-19
Music Publisher: Kid Latrine, BMI

Tim Goodman on the imagery of “Bright Sun Bright Rain” - “Colorado is one of the only places in the world I know where on a given day you can ski or snowboard in the mountains, then come down on the plains and play a round of golf. It’s just a wild state that way. You can have a beautiful, 70-degree, sunny day, then a bunch of clouds roll in over the mountains and you can see sun on the valley across the way – and you’re underneath a spray of rain. There is a magic (no pun intended) that happens. Literally you have bright rain. The rain is lit up by the sun. It’s a Colorado phenomenon that happens every summer, every afternoon about 2 o’clock.”

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