The 25 Most Anticipated Books of 2018

Books Lists best of 2018
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The 25 Most Anticipated Books of 2018

From a feminist twist on Sherlock Holmes to Zadie Smith’s new essay collection, our picks for the most anticipated books of 2018 promise entertaining reads for all literary tastes. The 25 books below, ordered by release date, will keep you well-read through July.

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1maamericanmarriage.png 1. An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

Release Date: February 6th from Algonquin Books

Why You’ll Love It: This utterly gripping novel from Tayari Jones explores marriage in an intimate and realistic way, making it an engaging read for both married and single audiences alike.

Description: Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive, and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined.

Roy is arrested and sentenced to 12 years for a crime Celestial knows he didn’t commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend and best man at their wedding. As Roy’s time in prison passes, she is unable to hold on to the love that has been her center. After five years, Roy’s conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together.

This stirring love story is a profoundly insightful look into the hearts and minds of three people who are at once bound and separated by forces beyond their control.

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1mafeelfree.jpg 2. Feel Free by Zadie Smith

Release Date: February 6th from Penguin Press

Why You’ll Love It: Because it’s an essay collection by the brilliant Zadie Smith.

Description: Arranged into five sections—In the World, In the Audience, In the Gallery, On the Bookshelf and Feel Free—this new essay collection poses questions we immediately recognize. What is The Social Network—and Facebook itself—really about? “It’s a cruel portrait of us: 500 million sentient people entrapped in the recent careless thoughts of a Harvard sophomore.” Why do we love libraries? “Well-run libraries are filled with people because what a good library offers cannot be easily found elsewhere: an indoor public space in which you do not have to buy anything in order to stay.” What will we tell our granddaughters about our collective failure to address global warming? “So I might say to her, look: the thing you have to appreciate is that we’d just been through a century of relativism and deconstruction, in which we were informed that most of our fondest-held principles were either uncertain or simple wishful thinking, and in many areas of our lives we had already been asked to accept that nothing is essential and everything changes—and this had taken the fight out of us somewhat.”

Gathering in one place for the first time previously unpublished work, as well as already classic essays, such as “Joy” and “Find Your Beach,” Feel Free offers a survey of important recent events in culture and politics, as well as Smith’s own life. Equally at home in the world of good books and bad politics, Brooklyn-born rappers and the work of Swiss novelists, she is by turns wry, heartfelt, indignant and incisive—and never any less than perfect company. This is literary journalism at its zenith.

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1mathefriend.jpeg 3. The Friend by Sigrid Nunez

Release Date: February 6th from Riverhead Books

Why You’ll Love It: We’ll always love a great human-canine relationship story, and Sigrid Nunez’s novel delivers an enthralling, emotional tale.

Description: When a woman unexpectedly loses her lifelong best friend and mentor, she finds herself burdened with the unwanted dog he has left behind. Her own battle against grief is intensified by the mute suffering of the dog, a huge Great Dane traumatized by the inexplicable disappearance of its master, and by the threat of eviction: dogs are prohibited in her apartment building.

While others worry that grief has made her a victim of magical thinking, the woman refuses to be separated from the dog except for brief periods of time. Isolated from the rest of the world, increasingly obsessed with the dog’s care, determined to read its mind and fathom its heart, she comes dangerously close to unraveling. But while troubles abound, rich and surprising rewards lie in store for both of them.

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1magoneworld.jpg 4. The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch

Release Date: February 6th from G.P. Putnam’s Sons

Why You’ll Love It: A novel pitched as Inception meets True Detective? Count us in! Plus, a film adaptation with District 9’s Neill Blomkamp as the director is already in the works.

Description: Shannon Moss is part of a clandestine division within the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. In western Pennsylvania, 1997, she is assigned to solve the murder of a Navy SEAL’s family—and to locate his vanished teenage daughter. Though she can’t share the information with conventional law enforcement, Moss discovers that the missing SEAL was an astronaut aboard the spaceship U.S.S. Libra—a ship assumed lost to the currents of Deep Time. Moss knows first-hand the mental trauma of time-travel and believes the SEAL’s experience with the future has triggered this violence.

Determined to find the missing girl and driven by a troubling connection from her own past, Moss travels ahead in time to explore possible versions of the future, seeking evidence to crack the present-day case. To her horror, the future reveals that it’s not only the fate of a family that hinges on her work, for what she witnesses rising over time’s horizon and hurtling toward the present is the Terminus: the terrifying and cataclysmic end of humanity itself.

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1malinebecomesariver.jpg 5. The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border by Francisco Cantú

Release Date: February 6th from Riverhead Books

Why You’ll Love It: Francisco Cantú’s timely book explores violence on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border from a personal perspective, making it necessary reading in 2018.

Description: For Francisco Cantú, the border is in the blood: his mother, a park ranger and daughter of a Mexican immigrant, raised him in the scrublands of the Southwest. Haunted by the landscape of his youth, Cantú joins the Border Patrol. He and his partners are posted to remote regions crisscrossed by drug routes and smuggling corridors, where they learn to track other humans under blistering sun and through frigid nights. They haul in the dead and deliver to detention those they find alive. Cantú tries not to think where the stories go from there.

Plagued by nightmares, he abandons the Patrol for civilian life. But when an immigrant friend travels to Mexico to visit his dying mother and does not return, Cantú discovers that the border has migrated with him, and now he must know the whole story.

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1maonlychild.png 6. Only Child by Rhiannon Navin

Release Date: February 6th from Knopf

Why You’ll Love It: Fans of Emma Donoghue’s Room will adore the six-year-old narrator in Only Child, and the novel’s take on a school shooting proves hauntingly relevant today.

Description: Squeezed into a coat closet with his classmates and teacher, first grader Zach Taylor can hear gunshots ringing through the halls of his school. A gunman has entered the building, taking 19 lives and irrevocably changing the very fabric of this close-knit community. While Zach’s mother pursues a quest for justice against the shooter’s parents, holding them responsible for their son’s actions, Zach retreats into his super-secret hideout and loses himself in a world of books and art. Armed with his newfound understanding, and with the optimism and stubbornness only a child could have, Zach sets out on a captivating journey towards healing and forgiveness, determined to help the adults in his life rediscover the universal truths of love and compassion needed to pull them through their darkest hours.

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1maallthepieces.jpg 7. All the Pieces Matter: The Inside Story of The Wire by Jonathan Abrams

Release Date: February 13th from Crown Archetype

Why You’ll Love It: If you love The Wire, you’ll love this book. And if you’ve never seen the show, Jonathan Abrams will have you binge-watching the series within reading the first 20 pages.

Description: Since its final episode aired in 2008, HBO’s acclaimed crime drama The Wire has only become more popular and influential. The issues it tackled, from the failures of the drug war and criminal justice system to systemic bias in law enforcement and other social institutions, have become more urgent and central to the national conversation. The show’s actors, such as Idris Elba, Dominic West and Michael B. Jordan, have gone on to become major stars. Its creators and writers, including David Simon and Richard Price, have developed dedicated cult followings of their own. Universities use the show to teach everything from film theory to criminal justice to sociology. Politicians and activists reference it when discussing policy. When critics compile lists of the Greatest TV Shows of All Time, The Wire routinely takes the top spot. It is arguably one of the great works of art America has produced in the 20th century.

But while there has been a great deal of critical analysis of the show and its themes, until now there has never been a definitive, behind-the-scenes take on how it came to be made. With unparalleled access to all the key actors and writers involved in its creation, Jonathan Abrams tells the astonishing, compelling and complete account of The Wire, from its inception and creation through its end and powerful legacy.

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1marendingnest.jpg 8. The Rending and the Nest by Kaethe Schwehn

Release Date: February 20th from Bloomsbury USA

Why You’ll Love It: Kaethe Schwehn’s post-apocalyptic novel delivers thrills and drama, tackling the question of what it means to love others in a broken world.

Description: When 95 percent of the earth’s population disappears for no apparent reason, Mira does what she can to create some semblance of a life: She cobbles together a haphazard community named Zion, scavenges the Piles for supplies they might need and avoids loving anyone she can’t afford to lose. She has everything under control. Almost.
Four years after the Rending, Mira’s best friend, Lana, announces her pregnancy, the first since everything changed and a new source of hope for Mira. But when Lana gives birth to an inanimate object—and other women of Zion follow suit—the thin veil of normalcy Mira has thrown over her new life begins to fray. As the Zionites wrestle with the presence of these Babies, a confident outsider named Michael appears, proselytizing about the world beyond Zion. He lures Lana away and when she doesn’t return, Mira must decide how much she’s willing to let go in order to save her friend, her home and her own fraught pregnancy.

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1magospeloftrees.jpg 9. The Gospel of Trees by Apricot Irving

Release Date: March 6th from Simon & Schuster

Why You’ll Love It: Apricot Irving’s honest memoir highlights the good, the bad and the ugly of missionary life, challenging traditional “white savior” narratives.

Description: Apricot Irving grew up as a missionary’s daughter in Haiti—a country easy to sensationalize but difficult to understand. Her father was an agronomist, a man who hiked alone into the hills with a macouti of seeds to preach the gospel of trees in a deforested but resilient country. Her mother and sisters, meanwhile, spent most of their days in the confines of the hospital compound they called home. As a child, this felt like paradise to Irving; as a teenager, the same setting felt like a prison. Outside of the walls of the missionary enclave, Haiti was a tumult of bugle-call bus horns and bicycles that jangled over hard-packed dirt, the clamor of chickens and cicadas, the sudden, insistent clatter of rain as it hammered across tin roofs and the swell of voices running ahead of the storm.

As she emerges into womanhood, an already confusing process made all the more complicated by Christianity’s demands, Irving struggles to understand her father’s choices. His unswerving commitment to his mission, and the anger and despair that followed failed enterprises, threatened to splinter his family.

Told against the backdrop of Haiti’s long history of intervention—often unwelcome—The Gospel of Trees grapples with the complicated legacy of those who wish to improve the world.

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1maspeaknoevil.jpg 10. Speak No Evil by Uzodinma Iweala

Release Date: March 6th from Harper

Why You’ll Love It: The long-awaited novel from Beasts of No Nation author Uzodinma Iweala, Speak No Evil offers a haunting story about identity and power.

Description: On the surface, Niru leads a charmed life. Raised by two attentive parents in Washington, D.C., he’s a top student and a track star at his prestigious private high school. Bound for Harvard in the fall, his prospects are bright. But Niru has a painful secret: he is queer—an abominable sin to his conservative Nigerian parents. No one knows except Meredith, his best friend, the daughter of prominent Washington insiders—and the one person who seems not to judge him.

When his father accidentally discovers Niru is gay, the fallout is brutal and swift. Coping with troubles of her own, however, Meredith finds that she has little left emotionally to offer him. As the two friends struggle to reconcile their desires against the expectations and institutions that seek to define them, they find themselves speeding toward a future more violent and senseless than they can imagine. Neither will escape unscathed.

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1matomorrowwillbedifferent.jpg 11. Tomorrow Will Be Different: Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality by Sarah McBride

Release Date: March 6th from Crown Archetype

Why You’ll Love It: Sarah McBride’s memoir is a must-read, offering encouragement while showing that the fight for equality is just getting started.

Description: Before she became the first transgender person to speak at a national political convention in 2016 at the age of 26, Sarah McBride struggled with the decision to come out—not just to her family but to the students of American University, where she was serving as student body president. She’d known she was a girl from her earliest memories, but it wasn’t until the Facebook post announcing her truth went viral that she realized just how much impact her story could have on the country.

Four years later, McBride was one of the nation’s most prominent transgender activists, walking the halls of the White House, advocating the passing of laws and addressing the country in the midst of a heated presidential election. And, she’d found her first love and future husband, Andy, a trans man and fellow activist, who complemented her in every way…until cancer tragically intervened.

Informative, heartbreaking and empowering, Tomorrow Will Be Different is McBride’s story of love and loss, a powerful entry point into the LGBTQ community’s battle for equal rights and what it means to be openly transgender.

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1madarwincomestotown.jpg 12. Darwin Comes to Town: How the Urban Jungle Drives Evolution by Menno Schilthuizen

Release Date: April 3rd from Picador

Why You’ll Love It: Evolutionary biologist Menno Schilthuizen delivers an entertaining look at how wildlife is rapidly adapting to urban habitats, offering fascinating examples from across the globe.

Description: Menno Schilthuizen is one of a growing number of “urban ecologists” studying how our manmade environments are accelerating the evolution of the animals and plants around us. Cities are extreme environments and, in a world of adapt or die, the wildlife sharing these spaces with us is being forced to adopt fascinating new ways of surviving, and often thriving:

Carrion crows in the Japanese city of Sendai have learned to use passing traffic to crack nuts.

Spiders in Vienna are adapting to build their webs near moth-attracting streetlights, while moths in some cities are developing a resistance to the lure of light bulbs.

Certain Puerto Rican city lizards are evolving feet that better grip surfaces like concrete.

Europe’s urban blackbirds sing at a higher pitch than their rural cousins, to be heard over the din of traffic, while many pigeons have eschewed traveling “as the crow flies” in favor of following manmade roads.
Darwin Comes to Town draws on these and other eye-popping examples to share a stunning vision of urban evolution in which humans and wildlife co-exist in a unique harmony.

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1mafemalepersuasion.jpg 13. The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer

Release Date: April 3rd from Riverhead Books

Why You’ll Love It: Meg Wolitzer’s electric novel tackles power, loyalty and relationships in one compulsively readable story.

Description: To be admired by someone we admire—we all yearn for this: the private, electrifying pleasure of being singled out by someone of esteem. But sometimes it can also mean entry to a new kind of life, a bigger world.

Greer Kadetsky is a shy college freshman when she meets the woman she hopes will change her life. Faith Frank, dazzlingly persuasive and elegant at 63, has been a central pillar of the women’s movement for decades, a figure who inspires others to influence the world. Upon hearing Faith speak for the first time, Greer—madly in love with her boyfriend, Cory, but still full of longing for an ambition that she can’t quite place—feels her inner world light up. And then, astonishingly, Faith invites Greer to make something out of that sense of purpose, leading Greer down the most exciting path of her life as it winds toward and away from her meant-to-be love story with Cory and the future she’d always imagined.

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1mavarina.jpg 14. Varina by Charles Frazier

Release Date: April 3rd from Ecco

Why You’ll Love It: Cold Mountain author Charles Frazier returns to the Civil War, this time weaving a captivating, devastating tale about the First Lady of the Confederate States of America.

Description: With her marriage prospects limited, teenage Varina Howell agrees to wed the much-older widower Jefferson Davis, with whom she expects a life of security as a Mississippi landowner. He instead pursues a career in politics and is eventually appointed president of the Confederacy, placing Varina at the white-hot center of one of the darkest moments in American history-culpable regardless of her intentions.

The Confederacy falling, her marriage in tatters and the country divided, Varina and her children escape Richmond and travel south on their own, now fugitives with “bounties on their heads, an entire nation in pursuit.”

Intimate in its detailed observations of one woman’s tragic life and epic in its scope and power, Varina is a novel of an American war and its aftermath. Ultimately, the book is a portrait of a woman who comes to realize that complicity carries consequences.

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1macirce.jpg 15. Circe by Madeline Miller

Release Date: April 10th from Little, Brown and Company

Why You’ll Love It: Madeline Miller’s follow-up to The Song of Achilles is just as mesmerizing, and you won’t be able to put down this luminous saga.

Description: In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child—not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power—the power of witchcraft, which can transform rivals into monsters and menace the gods themselves.

Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her occult craft, tames wild beasts and crosses paths with many of the most famous figures in all of mythology, including the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, the murderous Medea, and, of course, wily Odysseus.

But there is danger, too, for a woman who stands alone, and Circe unwittingly draws the wrath of both men and gods, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying and vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves most, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods she is born from or the mortals she has come to love.

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1mamacbeth.jpg 16. Macbeth by Jo Nesbø, translated by Don Bartlett

Release Date: April 10th from Hogarth

Why You’ll Love It: The latest addition to Hogarth’s Shakespeare project, Jo Nesbø’s gripping novel reimagines Macbeth in a drug-ridden industrial town in the 1970s.

Description: Duncan, chief of police, is idealistic and visionary, a dream to the townspeople but a nightmare for criminals. The drug trade is ruled by two drug lords, one of whom—a master of manipulation named Hecate—has connections with the highest in power and plans to use them to get his way.

Hecate’s plot hinges on steadily, insidiously manipulating Inspector Macbeth: the head of SWAT and a man already susceptible to violent and paranoid tendencies. What follows is an unputdownable story of love and guilt, political ambition and greed, exploring the darkest corners of human nature and the aspirations of the criminal mind.

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1matraumacleaner.jpg 17. The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman’s Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster by Sarah Krasnostein

Release Date: April 10th from St. Martin’s Press

Why You’ll Love It: It’s challenging to describe The Trauma Cleaner, but in chronicling a remarkable woman’s life, Sarah Krasnostein has created an engaging reading experience.

Description: Before she was a trauma cleaner, Sandra Pankhurst was many things: husband and father, drag queen, gender reassignment patient, sex worker, small businesswoman, trophy wife. . . But as a little boy, raised in violence and excluded from the family home, she just wanted to belong. Now she believes her clients deserve no less.

A woman who sleeps among garbage she has not put out for 40 years. A man who bled quietly to death in his living room. A woman who lives with rats, random debris and terrified delusion. The still life of a home vacated by accidental overdose.

Sarah Krasnostein has watched the extraordinary Sandra Pankhurst bring order and care to these, the living and the dead?and the book she has written is equally extraordinary. Not just the compelling story of a fascinating life among lives of desperation, but an affirmation that, as isolated as we may feel, we are all in this together.

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1mawomanoftheashes.jpg 18. Woman of the Ashes by Mia Couto, translated by David Brookshaw

Release Date: April 10th from Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Why You’ll Love It: The first book in a trilogy about southern Mozambique’s final emperor, Mia Couto’s Woman of the Ashes weaves a stunning tale of a war-torn period.

Description: Southern Mozambique, 1894. Sergeant Germano de Melo is posted to the village of Nkokolani to oversee the Portuguese conquest of territory claimed by Ngungunyane, the last of the leaders of the state of Gaza, the second-largest empire led by an African. Ngungunyane has raised an army to resist colonial rule and with his warriors is slowly approaching the border village.

Desperate for help, Germano enlists Imani, a 15-year-old girl, to act as his interpreter. She belongs to the VaChopi tribe, one of the few who dared side with the Portuguese. But while one of her brothers fights for the Crown of Portugal, the other has chosen the African emperor. Standing astride two kingdoms, Imani is drawn to Germano, just as he is drawn to her. But she knows that in a country haunted by violence, the only way out for a woman is to go unnoticed, as if made of shadows or ashes.

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1mabeforemars.jpg 19. Before Mars by Emma Newman

Release Date: April 17th from Ace

Why You’ll Love It: A standalone novel set in Emma Newman’s fantastic Planetfall universe, Before Mars delivers another thrilling sci-fi story that grapples with mental health issues.

Description: After months of travel, Anna Kubrin finally arrives on Mars for her new job as a geologist and de facto artist in residence—and already she feels she is losing the connection with her husband and baby at home on Earth.

In her room on the base, Anna finds a mysterious note, painted in her own hand, warning her not to trust the colony psychiatrist. A note she can’t remember painting.

When she finds a footprint in a place that the colony AI claims has never been visited by humans, Anna begins to suspect that she is caught up in an elaborate corporate conspiracy. Or is she losing her grip on reality? Anna must find the truth, regardless of what horrors she might discover or what they might do to her mind.

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1mahowtowrite.jpg 20. How to Write an Autobiographical Novel: Essays by Alexander Chee

Release Date: April 17th from Mariner Books

Why You’ll Love It: Believe the hype surrounding Alexander Chee’s upcoming essay collection; this book is well worth a read.

Description: How to Write an Autobiographical Novel is Alexander Chee’s manifesto on the entangling of life, literature and politics, and how the lessons learned from a life spent reading and writing fiction have changed him. In these essays, he grows from student to teacher, reader to writer, and reckons with his identities as a son, a gay man, a Korean American, an artist, an activist, a lover and a friend. He examines some of the most formative experiences of his life and the nation’s history, including his father’s death, the AIDS crisis, 9/11, the jobs that supported his writing—Tarot-reading, bookselling, cater-waiting for William F. Buckley—the writing of his first novel, Edinburgh, and the election of Donald Trump.

By turns commanding, heartbreaking and wry, How to Write an Autobiographical Novel asks questions about how we create ourselves in life and in art, and how to fight when our dearest truths are under attack.

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1maonlyhuman.jpg 21. Only Human by Sylvain Neuvel

Release Date: May 1st from Del Rey

Why You’ll Love It: We’re huge fans of Sylvain Neuvel’s The Themis Files series at Paste, and the third installment promises to ratchet up the stakes in an already compelling saga.

Description: In her childhood, Rose Franklin accidentally discovered a giant metal hand buried beneath the ground outside Deadwood, South Dakota. As an adult, Dr. Rose Franklin led the team that uncovered the rest of the body parts which together form Themis: a powerful robot of mysterious alien origin. She, along with linguist Vincent, pilot Kara and the unnamed Interviewer, protected the Earth from geopolitical conflict and alien invasion alike. Now, after nearly 10 years on another world, Rose returns to find her old alliances forfeit and the planet in shambles. And she must pick up the pieces of the Earth Defense Corps as her own friends turn against each other.

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1mathatkindofmother.jpg 22. That Kind of Mother by Rumaan Alam

Release Date: May 8th from Ecco

Why You’ll Love It: Rumaan Alam tackles motherhood and race in his sophomore novel, and the result is a deeply moving story that should be mandatory reading.

Description: Like many first-time mothers, Rebecca Stone finds herself both deeply in love with her newborn son and deeply overwhelmed. Struggling to juggle the demands of motherhood with her own aspirations and feeling utterly alone in the process, she reaches out to the only person at the hospital who offers her any real help—Priscilla Johnson—and begs her to come home with them as her son’s nanny.

Priscilla’s presence quickly does as much to shake up Rebecca’s perception of the world as it does to stabilize her life. Rebecca is white, and Priscilla is black, and through their relationship, Rebecca finds herself confronting, for the first time, the blind spots of her own privilege. She feels profoundly connected to the woman who essentially taught her what it means to be a mother.

When Priscilla dies unexpectedly in childbirth, Rebecca steps forward to adopt the baby. But she is unprepared for what it means to be a white mother with a black son. As she soon learns, navigating motherhood for her is a matter of learning how to raise two children whom she loves with equal ferocity, but whom the world is determined to treat differently.

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1maflorida.jpg 23. Florida by Lauren Groff

Release Date: June 5th from Riverhead Books

Why You’ll Love It: Lauren Groff (whose novel Fates and Furies topped Paste’s list of 2015’s best fiction books) delivers an exquisite short story collection with stories that will haunt you long after the final page.

Description: In her vigorous and moving new book, Lauren Groff brings her electric storytelling and intelligence to a world in which storms, snakes and sinkholes lurk at the edge of everyday life, but the greater threats and mysteries are of a human, emotional and psychological nature. Among those navigating it all are a resourceful pair of abandoned sisters; a lonely boy, grown up; a restless, childless couple; a searching, homeless woman; and an unforgettable, recurring character—a steely and conflicted wife and mother.

The stories in this collection span characters, towns, decades, even centuries, but Florida—its landscape, climate, history and state of mind—becomes its gravitational center: an energy, a mood, as much as a place of residence. Groff transports the reader, then jolts us alert with a crackle of wit, a wave of sadness, a flash of cruelty, as she writes about loneliness, rage, family and the passage of time. With shocking accuracy and effect, she pinpoints the moments and decisions and connections behind human pleasure and pain, hope and despair, love and fury—the moments that make us alive.

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1maincendiaries.jpg 24. The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon

Release Date: July 31st from Riverhead Books

Why You’ll Love It: R.O. Kwon’s brilliant debut novel dives into the world of domestic terrorism, and the results prove that she’s a writer to watch.

Description: Phoebe Lin and Will Kendall meet their first month at prestigious Edwards University. Phoebe is a glamorous girl who doesn’t tell anyone she blames herself for her mother’s recent death. Will is a misfit scholarship boy who transfers to Edwards from Bible college, waiting tables to get by. What he knows for sure is that he loves Phoebe.

Grieving and guilt-ridden, Phoebe is increasingly drawn into a religious group—a secretive extremist cult—founded by a charismatic former student, John Leal. He has an enigmatic past that involves North Korea and Phoebe’s Korean American family. Meanwhile, Will struggles to confront the fundamentalism he’s tried to escape, and the obsession consuming the one he loves. When the group bombs several buildings in the name of faith, killing five people, Phoebe disappears. Will devotes himself to finding her, tilting into obsession himself, seeking answers to what happened to Phoebe and if she could have been responsible for this violent act.

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1mastudyinhonor.jpg 25. A Study in Honor by Claire O’Dell

Release Date: July 31st from Harper Voyager

Why You’ll Love It: Claire O’Dell’s feminist, futuristic twist on Sherlock Holmes proves both captivating and compellingly entertaining.

Description: Dr. Janet Watson knows firsthand the horrifying cost of a divided nation. While treating broken soldiers on the battlefields of the New Civil War, a sniper’s bullet shattered her arm and ended her career. Honorably discharged and struggling with the semi-functional mechanical arm that replaced the limb she lost, she returns to the nation’s capital, a bleak, edgy city in the throes of a fraught presidential election. Homeless and jobless, Watson is uncertain of the future when she meets another black and queer woman, Sara Holmes, a mysterious yet playfully challenging covert agent who offers the doctor a place to stay.

Watson’s readjustment to civilian life is complicated by the infuriating antics of her strange new roommate. But the tensions between them dissolve when Watson discovers that soldiers from the New Civil War have begun dying one by one—and that the deaths may be the tip of something far more dangerous, involving the pharmaceutical industry and even the looming election. Joining forces, Watson and Holmes embark on a thrilling investigation to solve the mystery—and secure justice for these fallen soldiers.