The 40 Best Comedies on Netflix (June 2018)

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i love you man poster.jpg 20. I Love You, Man
Year: 2009
Director: John Hamburg
While Paul Rudd goes a little bit over the top with his awkward, almost-naive behavior at the beginning (think Michael Scott from The Office, who appears to be a clear influence on the character), Jason Segel and Rudd make for one dynamic duo. At times, one might assume there would be too much male bonding, but this film brings just the right amount of vulgar jokes, back-handed compliments, and sexual innuendo to the table.—Muriel Vega


13 going on 30 poster.jpg 19. 13 Going on 30
Year: 2004
Director: Gary Winick
What could’ve been easily dismissed as a shameless Big ripoff might be even better than that Tom Hanks classic. Jennifer Garner is at her most charming as a 13-year-old in a grown-up’s body, and perennially underrated Judy Greer shines in her finest film role as Garner’s best frenemy. The sweetly nostalgic script might deserve the most credit, though—a movie like this could have been ruined by lethal levels of cheese, but 13 Going on 30 has the exact right amount of crowd-pleasing schmaltz.—Allyn Moore


meet-the-parents.jpg 18. Meet the Parents
Year: 2000
Director: Jay Roach
Robert DeNiro’s comedy chops were never more perfectly suited than with his role as Jack Byrnes, the over-protective father who brings out the absolute worst in his son-in-law to be, male nurse Gaylord Focker (Ben Stiller). Every boyfriend’s nightmare about making a good impression comes to pass as Focker makes every wrong-headed decision that you’d expect from a Stiller character at this point. Plenty of laugh-out-loud moments make this now-classic slapstick comedy of errors a fun, popcorn movie night.—Josh Jackson


mindhorn poster.jpg 17. Mindhorn
Year: 2016
Director: Sean Foley
Julian Barratt gives a charismatic lead performance, using those chiseled cheekbones and glorious mustache in concert with uncommonly sad eyes to make his washed-up actor Richard Thorncroft both recognizable and worthy of empathy, despite his arrogance and stupidity. The rest of the cast is also strong, though largely overshadowed by Barratt’s magnetism. If Steve Coogan, who also produced, wants to continue spending large chunks of his time in very small, brutally funny roles in comedy movies (see: The Other Guys, In the Loop, and technically Hot Fuzz), that’s fine by me. Kenneth Branagh, shockingly, cameos as himself in one early scene where he auditions Richard for a Hamlet adaption—it’s nice to see he has a sense of humor about still being the go-to Shakespeare guy. It’s clear, in any case, that Mindhorn is a labor of love for the cast and crew.—Deborah Krieger


frances-ha.jpg 16. Frances Ha
Year: 2012
Director: Noah Baumbach 
Frances Ha is endearing, kind and, in many ways, Noah Baumbach’s best movie to date. One could trace his films, from his debut (Kicking and Screaming) to his most recent (Greenberg) and see a slow but steady focus on the individual, as well as his abandonment of an ironic, sometimes caustic stance against the very characters he writes. It is as if Baumbach could only write a certain type of person—the privileged, socially crippled intellectual with either too much self-awareness or none at all—and for a while it seemed like even the writer himself couldn’t stand to be in the same room with such characters. This anger has faded, and what has emerged over his last few films, and culminated in Frances Ha, is an embrace of not only the flaws of his characters, but also his flaws as a filmmaker. He has settled down and created a film imbued with love, fun and melancholy. It feels simple and open and is a joy to watch.—Joe Peeler


25.BreakfastAtTiffanys.NetflixList.jpg 15. Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Year: 1961
Director: Blake Edwards
It can be difficult to get past the extreme racism of Mickey Rooney playing a Japanese landlord in Blake Edwards’s beloved classic. Nobody should have any problem with people who refuse to watch a movie with such a character in 2018. If you can look past his brief scenes, though, you’ll find a romantic comedy that deserves its iconic reputation. It features Audrey Hepburn at her finest, and is the main reason every Anthropologie is full of books and art prints about her. It’s a romantic comedy that’s both romantic and funny, and, yes, extremely racist.—Garrett Martin


CoverMoonrise.jpg 14. Moonrise Kingdom
Year: 2012
Director: Wes Anderson 
Anderson and co-writer Roman Coppola avoid clichés at every opportunity. The forces that would typically work to tear Sam and Suzy apart instead rally behind them, perhaps infected by the conviction of their love, which never wavers, even in argument: “I love you, but you don’t know what you’re talking about.” Moonrise Kingdom is whimsical and, yes, precious, but it is so in the very best sense of the word.—Annlee Ellingson


Ghostbusters.jpeg 13. Ghostbusters
Year: 1984
Director: Ivan Reitman
As the slew of ‘80s merchandise and a cartoon series would prove, Ghostbusters had mass-appeal with kids. The film followed a team of parapsychologists—played by Dan Aykroyd, the late Harold Ramis, Ernie Hudson and Bill Murray—who tackle big-ghost issues in New York City. Sure some of the effects are dated, but this one has staying power. And although the bad guys come from beyond the grave, they’re also kid-friendly, with the begging-to-be-a-plush-toy Slimer and a giant Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man. Pass this classic comedy along to the next generation.—Tyler Kane


trip to italy poster.jpg 12./11. The Trip to Italy / The Trip to Spain
Year: 2014/2016
Director: Michael Winterbottom
Sadly the first of Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon and Michael Winterbottom’s comedy travelogues isn’t on Netflix. You don’t need to see it to enjoy the two sequels, though, which we’ve lumped together because they are equally great and hilarious. Watching two middle-aged men eat their way through scenic European vistas might not sound like a great recipe for laughs, but Coogan and Brydon are both brilliant comic minds, and together they have an easy and irresistible charm that makes their impression-heavy banter deeply enjoyable.—Garrett Martin


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