The 50 Best Fantasy Books of the 21st Century (So Far)

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king-attola.jpg 25. The King of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner (2006)
Megan Whalen Turner’s conniving hero-thief, Eugenides, may have first pulled the rug out from under YA Fantasy readers in 1996’s The Thief, but his unreliably narrated adventures didn’t end there. Moving away from Gen’s perspective in the 2000 sequel, The Queen of Attolia, Turner gave his already bamboozled fans more twists and turns to trip over, but it was in the Queen’s Thief series’ third installment, 2006’s The King of Attolia—in which she removes the reader even more thoroughly from the heads of Gen and Attolia—that it became clear how clever her writing is, and how little we will ever know about Eugenides’ motivations. To say more is to spoil one of fantasy’s most disorienting rollercoasters of a first-read experience—the story’s narrative structures build themselves up several paces behind the reader, leaving us constantly surprised to discover where things have been going while we were reading along, clueless—but once you’ve reached the series’ (temporary) end, knowing where Gen ends up in The King of Attolia will only make you want to start right back over at the beginning. —Alexis Gunderson

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perdido-st-station.jpg 24. Perdido Street Station by China Miéville (2000)
A human scientist is approached by a de-winged bird-man who wants to fly again. The scientist inadvertently raises a monstrous killer moth while attempting to restore the bird-man’s flight, and the scientist’s insectoid girlfriend is captured by a mob boss who wants to milk the moth for a hallucinogenic substance. If that barebones description made you feel like you had consumed a hallucinogen yourself, than China Miéville’s nearly 900-page fantasy doorstopper will either confuse the hell out of you or engross you like nothing else—or both. Set in the Bas-Lag world that’s home to some of Miéville’s other stories, Perdido Street Station blends Victorian steampunk aesthetics with a thriving, bizarre take on magic, here called “thaumaturgy.” Miéville’s world-building is fast and furious, but almost always rooted in the physical in a way that brings even the oddest concepts to tangible life. Perdido Street Station swept the speculative-fiction world’s award nominations in 2000 and 2001, and took home a British Fantasy Society trophy, among others, announcing Miéville as one of the most daring and innovative voices in fantasy this millennium. —Steve Foxe

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carry-on.jpg 23. Carry On by Rainbow Rowell (2015)
Everything about Rainbow Rowell’s “Hogwarts, but gay” standalone, Carry On, seems impossible—it is Rowell’s novel-length slash-fic finale to the fictional Simon Snow “Chosen One” wizardry school series she created for the main character of her contemporary New Adult novel, Fangirl, to write anonymous fan-fic of—and yet, it gloriously, gleefully, gaily does work, almost like a literal charm. Simon and Baz, for all they are there mainly to pin a whole novel’s worth of slash-fic hopes and dreams to, are compellingly multi-dimensional, their star-crossed romance managing to be both earnestly swoony and necessary to make any sense of the greater magical plot, whose shape in this, the finale to a series that doesn’t exist, the reader is mostly left to infer from the rest of the narrative’s negative space. Not that the plot matters all that much in the end—you are just supposed to have fun spending some time in Simon and Baz’s wizardly world. And in Rowell’s magical hands, you do. —Alexis Gunderson

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throne-crescent-moon.jpg 22. Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin Ahmed (2012)
That epic fantasy favors Euro-centric influences is an understatement the size of the Tolkein family estate; enter Saladin Ahmed’s Throne of the Crescent Moon to deliver a master class in sourcing your fantasy from historical periods other than medieval Europe. Drawing heavily from Middle Eastern mythology, Throne of the Crescent Moon follows Doctor Adoulla Makhslood, a paunchy, past-his-prime ghul hunter drawn away from his impending retirement by a wicked plot brewing in the royal palace. Ahmed, who has found success writing for Marvel Comics and BOOM! Studios, surrounds the Doctor with a varied cast, including a resourceful older married couple, a shape-shifting tribeswoman with nothing to lose and an honor-bound Dervish warrior. Sadly, Ahmed’s attention seems to have shifted fully to comics for the time being, and the proposed second two books in the The Crescent Moon Kingdoms series haven’t materialized in the six years since Throne of the Crescent Moon hit shelves. Since this Locus Award-winning first volume does stand alone, the lack of sequels doesn’t mar our hearty recommendation. —Steve Foxe

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coraline.jpg 21. Coraline by Neil Gaiman (2002)
You’ve got to hand it to Neil Gaiman: he excels when it comes to assembling an enticing fantasy/adventure lark that turns dark. This modern day Alice In Wonderland starts out quite charming, with the precocious Coraline Jones and her parents moving into a mansion full of quirky flat-mates and a talking cat. But the stakes rise when a monstrous entity masquerading as Coraline’s mother kidnaps the girl’s real parents, leaving Coraline to rely on the assistance of eerie allies in the ghosts of children ensnared by the spell of “Other-Mother.” The grotesquery levels peak particularly high on the scare-o-meter for horror fans when Coraline has to figure out (and eventually fight) her way to conquering this intensely fearsome foe. —Jeff Milo

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way-of-shadows.jpg 20. The Way of Shadows by Brent Weeks (2008)
The orphan struggling for survival in the poorest slum of the poorest city may be something of a fantasy trope, but there are few characters quite like Azoth, pulled out of his misery by the city’s greatest assassin Durzo Blint. There’s very little that’s black-and-white in Brent Weeks’ seedy underworld of the Night Angel trilogy with its killer-with-hearts-of-low-karat-gold protagonists, conniving sympathetic prostitutes and brutal young gangsters. And somehow all three books were published between October and December of 2008—just a little factoid to depress fans of Patrick Rothfuss and George R.R. Martin. —Josh Jackson

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corner-of-white.jpg 19. A Corner of White by Jaclyn Moriarty (2013)
It’s difficult to describe Jaclyn Moriarty’s Colors of Madeline trilogy, which begins with 2013’s A Corner of White and features both a magical parallel universe in which colored winds can soothe or terrorize whole cities and a homeschool history report on Isaac Newton as a pivotal plot point. It’s kind of a fantasy, except that Madeline’s non-magical Earth-world is shaped by television game shows and crushes between schoolmates, and Elliot’s magical Cello-world has computers and cars and high-school ballgames. It’s kind of a portal story, except the portal is only as big as a mail slot. It is kind of an epistolary story, except most of the story is written in prose. It’s kind of a quest novel, except most of the characters necessary to the quest don’t know the rest exist. It’s kind of, fantastically, everything, none of which you will expect, all of which you will love. —Alexis Gunderson

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memory-of-light.jpg 18. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson (2013)
Robert Jordan’s sprawling, beloved 14-book Wheel of Time series could have, at times, used a more merciless editor. But if it drags in the middle, it finishes strong, thanks to an assist from Brandon Sanderson, who took over the series following Jordan’s untimely death in 2007 at the age of 58. A Memory of Light gave us a satisfying ending to the epic high fantasy saga. Our heroes from the quiet village of Two Rivers and their motley cast of allies all get their moments to shine. Jordan’s complex mythologies, prophesies, histories, battles and systems of magic thread together tightly in the monumental final entry. —Josh Jackson

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tricksters-queen.jpg 17. Trickster’s Queen by Tamora Pierce (2004)
Tamora Pierce has been building out her fantastic world of Tortall for over 30 years (Alanna of Trebond, later to become the Lioness, first leapt onto our shelves in 1983), but it wasn’t until the anti-slavery, anti-colonialism Daughter of the Lioness duology appeared in 2003 (Trickster’s Choice) and 2004 (Trickster’s Queen) that Pierce started deeply interrogating the real and complex injustices that arise in a world whose political realities require knights and heroes and magical quests in the first place. Following Alanna’s teenage daughter, Aly, as a rebellious mission to prove her spy mettle results in her being captured and enslaved alongside native raka in the luarin-colonized Copper Isles—which in turn results in the Trickster god, Kyprioth, contracting her to keep two sisters of the raka royal bloodline safe from scheming luarin machinations in anticipation of a full raka rebellion—Trickster’s Choice and Trickster’s Queen are satisfyingly complex, surprisingly romantic, and compellingly progressive. Plus, while they are full of Pierce’s signature Tortallian magic, they are eminently enjoyable on their own, even for readers completely unfamiliar with Tortall and Alanna the Lioness. —Alexis Gunderson

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who-fears-death.jpg 16. Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor (2007)
Who Fears Death is, in short, stunning. Set in a post-nuclear-holocaust Africa, the novel follows a child of rape destined to become a powerful sorcerer. Nnedi Okorafor utilizes her gorgeous prose to dissect topics many shy away from—sexual violence, genocide, war, religion—resulting in a mesmerizing saga that chronicles one woman’s extraordinary life. Trust us, Who Fears Death is necessary reading for the fantasy canon. —Frannie Jackson

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Thumbnail image for SixofCrows.jpg 15. Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo (2015)
Set two years after the end of Leigh Bardugo’s Grisha Trilogy, Six of Crows is impossible to put down, boasting an inspiring fantasy world that’s easy to get lost in. The novel takes you back to her fantasy realm of Ketterdam, featuring a ragtag crew of outcasts who must pull off a major heist. The result is a fast-paced story that will keep you turning the (beautifully designed) pages for hours. And if you haven’t read Bardugo’s original trilogy, don’t worry! Six of Crows stands on its own. —Eric Smith

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wise-mans-fear.jpg 14. The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss (2011)
Book Two in what we all hope will eventually be a trilogy, The Wise Man’s Fear continues Kvothe’s tale of how he went from orphaned musician to feared magician to king-killer to humble innkeeper. After defending a charge of Consortation with Demonic Powers, he takes a break from his studies at the University, and his adventures include a trip to the land of the Fae, where he’s been seduced by the nymph-like Felurian. It may not be quite the masterpiece (which you’ll find below), but it’s still one of the great books of fantasy literature and more than enough to have fans scouring for every hint of a publish date for Book Three. —Josh Jackson

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harry-potter-half-blood.jpg 13. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling (2005)
In the 2000s, the Harry Potter novels became the rare series read by fantasy fans and non-fantasy fans, book lovers and non-book lovers, basically everyone on planet Earth. Harry, Hermione and Ron captured our collective hearts even as they bickered and lost trust in each other. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, the coming-of-age story mined all the difficulties of adolescence from young love to overconfidence in one’s own widsom to seeing the world in unblinking black and white. Harry comes to believe his dual nemeses at Hogwarts—Draco Malfoy and Severus Snape—are in direct league with Lord Voldemort, something he gets only partly right. Snape has finally won the job he’s coveted all these years—Defence Against the Dark Arts professor—and Malfoy brags about a mission that the Dark Lord has entrusted to him. Meanwhile, Harry relies on a mysterious former student’s notes in his Potions book, and Ron’s jealousy leads him into his first meaningless romance, putting a wedge between himself and Hermione. The books grew up along with their characters and their readers, raising the stakes and emotions in the best-selling book series in history. —Josh Jackson

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storm-of-swords.jpg 12. A Storm of Swords by George R.R. Martin (2000)
No author does Machiavellian political intrigue quite like George R.R. Martin. In the third entry of the Song of Ice and Fire series made famous by HBO’s Game of Thrones, the brutality of Westeros reaches new heights. This is the novel that contains The Red Wedding, the imprisonment of Davos Seaworth and Tyrion, and mutiny against the Commander of the Night’s Watch. But if Martin can be accused of a lack of empathy for his protagonists, it’s a trait that only makes the reader love them even more and keeps us all glued to the page. When one of our favorite characters dies, we fear for the next one. And one thing these books aren’t lacking for is intriguing characters. Jon Snow, Arya Stark, Tyrion Lannister, Daenerys Targaryen: These names will remain iconic figures in fantasy literature long after many books on this list go out of print. —Josh Jackson

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night-circus.jpg 11. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern (2011)
A Romeo & Juliet-esque love story between two powerful young magicians that can actually do real magic, everything about Morgenstern’s debut novel is stunning. The actual Night Circus is a traveling spectacle, a secret that arrives each year, and in this year’s traveling troupe, these two smitten magic-wielders are unknowing pitted against one another, their very lives at stake. For the people they’ve studied with and trusted all these years, are using them a pieces in a game. With several narratives weaving in and out of the magical romance, Morgenstern expertly weaves a beautiful tapestry of a novel, that soars as high as the tents in the fictional circus. The Night Circus is a place, and a book, you’ll want to visit over and over. —Eric Smith

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city-of-brass.jpg 10. The City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty (2017)
A newer book on the list, The City of Brass published at the end of 2017, and is the first book in Chakraborty’s Daevabad trilogy. But it’s already earned a spot as one of the most memorable, and best, fantasy novels we’ve ever read. Set in the 18th century, readers meet Nahri, a skilled con woman who swindles her way through life… until she makes a mistake of magical consequences. She summons a djinn warrior, and finds herself thrown into the magical, mythical world she never believed existed. And at the heart of that world, is the City of Brass, a place called Daevabad. It’s here that she’s caught up in the brewing tensions between tribes of djinn, and her awesome adventure takes off. With lush world building and prose that is impossible to turn away from, it’s a refreshingly original take on a fantasy world that pulls from the largely untapped world of Islamic folklore. —Eric Smith

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cloud-atlas.jpg 9. Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell (2004)
David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas is a formal masterpiece, a book whose structure is an essential part of its story. That’s not an easy stunt to pull off without seeming like a showoff or dragging readers out of the narrative to examine the plumbing or being just plain alienating, but he does it beautifully. A sort of mirror-plated Chinese box, the story’s structure is inspired by Italo Calvino’s If on a winter’s night a traveler, containing several interrupted narratives in a nested sequence, with each connected to the next by a single character from the previous one. A 19th century American lawyer meets Maori people and missionaries in England; a young British composer in the 1930s talks a dying luminary into making him his amanuensis; the young composer’s lover ends up a nuclear scientist in the Reagan ’70s in California; a journalist with a bullseye on her back; a vanity publisher; a slave from a future world; a tribesman in a post-apocalypric Hawai’i. Multi-POV narratives can be challenging to sustain even when all the characters are in the same story—doing it with six separate, barely-connected narratives is almost a magic trick. Mitchell’s novel is a structural tour de force and possibly one of the most intriguing books of the 21st century (so far). —Amy Glynn

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fifth-season.jpg 8. The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin (2015)
The first book in N.K. Jemisin’s Broken Earth Trilogy introduces a stunning world in the midst of an apocalyptic event. To avoid major spoilers, let’s just say that the Hugo Award-winning novel is brimming with gloriously intense family drama and includes one of the most phenomenal magic systems ever created. The Fifth Season also boasts a complex protagonist who is a mother, gifting us with one of the most formidable and fascinating characters of the 21st century. —Frannie Jackson

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mistborn-final-empire.jpg 7. Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson (2006)
In exploring a shocking question—What happens if the hero fails and the villain reigns?—Brandon Sanderson kicks off a thrilling fantasy saga with Mistborn: The Final Empire. It boasts all of the best fantasy elements: a unique magic system, a ragtag group of rebels led by a charismatic rogue, an orphan with mysterious powers. But Sanderson weaves those predictable elements into a breathtaking saga that promises twists every step of the way. Mistborn succeeds in celebrating what makes fantasy magical while simultaneously delivering a fresh adventure that’s endlessly entertaining. —Frannie Jackson

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lies-locke.jpg 6. The Lies of Lock Lamora by Scott Lynch (2006)
This is not the only tale of young orphan escaping a world of abject poverty on this list, but it’s the one that takes the most joy in the scheming thievery that makes his escape possible. Lock Lamora is a precociously gifted pick-pocket and con artist before he’s tall enough to reach the hips of most adults, but his skills are perfected once he apprentices with Father Chains, becoming an official priest of the Crooked Warden and one of the Gentleman Bastards whose motto is: “Richer and cleverer than everyone else.” The Lies of Locke Lamora gets its inspiration as much from heist stories as it does from the worlds of epic fantasy. Locke and his crew must rely on their wits, disguises, acting, sleights of hand and good ol’ fashioned muscle as they go up against an actual magician. Locke Lamora—the Thorn of Camorr—takes his place among fiction’s most lovable rogues and gentleman thieves, alongside Robin Hood, Thomas Crown, Danny Ocean and Moist von Lipwig. —Josh Jackson

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Ember.jpg 5. An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir (2015)
Set in a world resembling ancient Rome, An Ember in the Ashes is an epic fantasy novel of love and revenge. When a young soldier groomed to take over the oppressive, military government decides to turn his back on the regime, he collides with a young scholar determined to save her brother. He’s a soldier, she’s a slave, and together they prepare to discover their freedom. It’s a hefty book, but you’ll devour this electrifying tome in no time. The story continues in A Torch Against the Night. —Eric Smith

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fragile-things.jpg 4. Fragile Things by Neil Gaiman (2006)
It’s borderline frustrating that Neil Gaiman has yet to meet a storytelling medium that he can’t master, and so it’s no mistake that Fragile Things, his 2006 collection, is subtitled Short Fiction and Wonders. From a gothic send-up (“Forbidden Brides of the Faceless Slaves in the Secret House of the Night of Dread Desire”) to a Lovecraftian Sherlock Holmes tale (“A Study in Emerald”), a humorous poem later adapted into a series of t-shirts (“The Day the Saucers Came”) to an American Gods novella (The Monarch of the Glen), Fragile Things spans the breadth of what constitutes fantastic fiction, and each and every one is a “wonder” indeed. Aside from the previously mentioned Lovecraft/Holmes mashup, though, Fragile Things is probably best known for “How to Talk to Girls at Parties,” a melancholy Hugo Award-nominated science-fiction story that perfectly captures the alien experience of being a teenager. —Steve Foxe

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deathly-hallows.jpg 3. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling (2007)
The culmination of the Harry Potter series was, it has to be said, pretty overweight—a competent copy editor could’ve removed a hundred pages from the manuscript without doing a thing other than deleting repetitive lines and phrases. But the voracious readers of the series would’ve forgiven a lot more than imperfect prose styling: We were dying to see Harry’s search for the Horcruxes and his final showdown against Lord Voldemort. And we got that plus a lot more: In the conclusion to the seven-book series J.K. Rowling not only continues to evoke the magically vivid secret world of Wizards living unnoticed under the noses of the non-magical, but she also does some of her best character development work as Harry is forced to confront his own death, his relationships with loss, with power, with bereavement, with knowledge gotten too late, with questions that didn’t get asked, and with love. It largely dispenses with the good-versus-evil paradigm that characterized the earlier books; as Harry has grown up, he’s learned that no one is truly 100% one or the other (though Voldemort’s still pretty close). An archetypal, alchemy-suffused coming-of-age tale set in a highly clever and lavishly realized alternate world, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the kind of book you read over and over, simply because the culmination is so satisfying. A flawed piece of prose but a wonderful finale to a thoroughly marvelous concept. —Amy Glynn

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way-of-kings.jpg 2. The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson (2010)
Brandon Sanderson is a master of many aspects of the fantasy genre: epic world-building, coherent systems of magic and unforgettable character development. All those are in peak form in his masterwork, The Way of Kings, the first of his three-book-long-and-counting series The Stormlight Archive. Roshar is a world where magic is rare, but spren—the spirits of just about every object or idea—are common. A few magic items like soulcasters, shard blades and shard plates are remnants of a grander age. In nations like Alethkar and Jah Keved, light eyes are revered, while those with dark eyes remain a lower caste. The Way of Kings is told from the points-of-view of four loosely connected characters, but the main focus is on Kaladin, a darkeyed soldier betrayed by his light-eyed commander and sold into slavery. With every shred of humanity and defiance beaten out of him, his final indignity is getting forced to carry bridges to the frontlines of an endless war—a death sentence. But his fellow crewman of Bridge Four find brotherhood and redemption in the most hopeless of places. The other two books of the Stormlight Archive are fantastic, but nothing compares to Kaladin’s original heroic journey in The Way of Kings. —Josh Jackson

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name-of-the-wind.jpg 1. The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss (2007)
Kvothe’s tale, reluctantly told by the old innkeeper himself, is as gripping, emotional and imaginative as any fantasy story put to paper. Born into a family of traveling musicians, Kvothe’s world is upended when the mythical Chandrian murder his family. He becomes a directionless pickpocket and thief before learning more about his parents’ killers and resolving that the ultimate answers can only be found by attending the University. His years there are filled with young love, rivalry with wealthier classmates and music. Kvothe the narrator is a world-renowned magician, musician and sword-fighter, but his autobiography is a coming-of-age story with full of hardship and drama. And Patrick Rothfuss is the kind of writer that transcends genre qualifiers. The prose is masterful with rich characterization exhilarating storytelling. Not a word feels out of place. This is the kind of book you recommend to anyone, whether or not they think they like fantasy. And then they can join you in waiting impatiently for the third installment in the Kingkiller Chronicle following 2011’s The Wise Man’s Fear. —Josh Jackson

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