18 Musical Moms Talk Motherhood

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18 Musical Moms Talk Motherhood

As a website that celebrates all kinds of artistic creativity, we regularly talk about ambitious art as a mind-blowing original documentary, experimental gaming platform or a sprawling double LP. But today we acknowledge that all these pale in comparison to art of parenting.

And for moms who happen to be professional musicians, splitting time between music and kids places them at a creative crossroads during every waking hour of their day—crafting a pop song at one moment and taking the kids to school the next; touring while changing diapers; practicing songs as well as potty training.

For Mother’s Day, we’ve decided to not only look at the maternal ties that bind moms and their children together, but the musical bonds that run deep within each of these families. We spoke with 18 musical moms to hear how they manage to keep their sanity amidst these two hectic full time gigs.

Kimya Dawson
The Moldy Peaches
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Photo: Chrissy Piper / Song: “Anyone Else But You”

Name and age of your kid:
Panda Delilah, age 4.

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
It hasn’t change things all that much. She’s been to 18 countries and does really well on the road. Sometimes we bring a babysitter on tour with us. That really helps because Panda isn’t always interested in hanging out at the show. I guess the other difference on tour is that we are less likely to sleep on the couch or floor of someone we don’t know. That’s for both safety reasons and social reasons. It’s hard at the end of an overstimulating day to not have our own space to wind down in, so we usually stay at hotels or with friends who understand that we need some space. I used to crash in any old place.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Panda has been around music and musicians her whole life. I was touring up until 12 days before she was born. She makes up little songs and has a really amazing sense of humor. She just asked me the other day if she and I can make a follow up to Alphabutt, another album for kids. I love that she wants to make songs with me. We’ve been able to take her to a lot of places and she’s been exposed to a lot of cultures and languages. It’s also great that my schedule is totally flexible when I’m not touring. We have lots of time for adventures.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
The hardest part is making sure that she doesn’t just get swept up in the chaos of touring, and really taking time to figure out how to meet her needs. She’s old enough to start kindergarten next year, but we’re likely going to take the year off of school and tour. I’ve begun networking with other unschoolers around the country to make sure she has kids to play with along the way who can take us to cool places like aquariums, amusement parks, children’s museums, and playgrounds. Keeping her social and entertained is challenging, but when we figure out what’s fun for her, it’s usually fun for everyone.

What does your kid think of your music?
She likes my songs for kids and a few of my other songs. There are only two or three songs on my new album Thunder Thighs that she likes (one of which she co-wrote). She doesn’t like sad songs. She hates the mention of death. I totally understand. From when she was nine months old, she has reacted really strongly to certain sad songs. I have a lot of sad songs. I’m not offended that she isn’t into them! She’s four. She loves burps, farts and puppies.


Amy Milan
Stars
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Song: “Set Yourself On Fire”

Name and age of your kid:
Delphine Rita Jane Cranley, 6 weeks.

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
There’s a temptation to run for the hills with the baby strapped to my back and never return. Writing music and playing guitar behind a farmhouse for a whole brood of children seems more glamorous now. Maybe my career is about to take a sharp turn: “Free-run hens—sold cheap here!!”

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Musician pals make a great village. Everyone feels in on your new person and you know your kid’s life is going to be rich with wing-nuts. Plus, having two musicians as parents means we make up about 17 songs a day—songs to go along with all the ins and outs. “Shushy pants” is our latest hit.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
I’m not sure how much hearing I have lost, so when we play “C is for cookie,” is it way too loud?

What does your kid think of your music?
Well right now she thinks my music is Alison Krauss and Ralph Stanley because that’s what I’ve been singing all day since she was born. So far her huge blue eyeballs seem to like it.


Kori Gardner
Mates of State
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Song: “Get Better”

Names and ages of your kids:
Magnolia, age 6; June, age 3.

How does having children and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
I appreciate my time more. It used to be whenever I felt like playing music, or playing a show, or recording, we could just be spontaneous. Now I savor those moments as an artist. With kids I focus on them when it’s their time and music when it’s work time.

Every time we set up a tour we have to be cognizant about school stuff, about how much is feasible with kids, etc. Also, because of being a touring musician and mother, I’m currently starting a new side business called ChARTer Nannies—which is essentially hooking up touring bands and artists with touring nannies.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Taking my kids on tour with me, setting our own hours, showing my daughters that you really can do what you want with your life and now that they are getting older we are having some sweet family jam sessions.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Sometimes I wish had more routine and a set schedule in my life. Parenting is always easier that way—kids thrive on routine. But I’m guess I’m teaching them how to be adaptable and flexible.

What does your kid think of your music?
They ask for it sometimes and other times they say, can we please stop listening to your new song…

Right now Magnolia has four things on her iPod: Free Energy (whom we toured with—she cried when the tour ended), Cyndi Lauper, “Hey Soul Sister” by Train (kids in class have been singing it) and the entire Mates of State catalog. And they are good little sounding boards—kids are brutally honest when something isn’t instantaneous and perfectly sincere about what they like.


Shara Worden
My Brightest Diamond
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Photo: Michael Wright / Song: “Inside A Boy”

Name and age of your kid:
Constantine, 9 months.

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
I definitely think about economizing my time and energy, especially when taking on new projects. I’m more aware that when I say yes to one thing, I am saying no to something (or someone) else. In many ways life does not look that different, because I have been in writing and recording mode. After we do a bunch of touring in the fall I might have a different story.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Having a life dedicated to art making is exhilarating and it also comes with a lot of sacrifices. I’m really thankful that I waited as long as I did to have a child, but also that I didn’t sacrifice this experience of being a mother, for having a life in music. So far, the best part of motherhood is having this very unique kind of love, awe and wonder for someone.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Missing out on my son’s first ride in a swing… It’s hard to miss out on the firsts in his life because I am working. And also, there are times when I don’t dedicate my time to a musical project, as I once would have. Sometimes I fall short, but I have to accept that what I have to give in each place of my life is enough.

What does your kids think of your music?
Constantine loves watching people’s fingers while they are playing guitar and he could stare at a drummer forever. It’s fun to see him soaking up music with his eyes and ears and body.


Emma Nadeau
Lost In The Trees
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Photo: D.L. Anderson / Song: “Walk Around The Lake”

Name and age of your kid:
Madeleine, age 2 ½.

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
I guess the stakes are a lot higher now, though I try not to let that get in the way of the creativity or the fun! But there is more of a pressure to be successful because I’ve got another mouth to feed, so to speak. And all the touring better be worth [for] every minute I have to be away from her!

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Having an inherently social job is really awesome when you have a family! Although the consistency of a regular day job is attractive, I generally don’t envy nine-to-fivers whose jobs are totally separate from their families. Our house is the band hub for rehearsals, photo shoots, meetings, etc., which means that there are always people coming in and out. My bandmates are Madeleine’s best friends! And it’s really cool to see her develop a special relationship with music because she knows the people who are performing it. We’ll listen to albums by local artists, and she’ll say, “That’s Josh singing!” or “Mark plays the bells!”

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Touring is pretty difficult, but even worse than being away is the inconsistency and instability of it all. One month I’ll be in performance and late-night socializing mode and the next month I’ll be in full-time Mommy mode! Luckily, I have an amazing husband (also a musician!) who is flexible and able to be at home with Madeleine while I’m away. It can be really tough to negotiate sometimes, though.

What does your kids think of your music?
Madeleine loves it! Well, she loves Ari… whenever we get in the car and I ask her what she wants to listen to; she says, “I want Ari.” I really don’t think there’s ever been another answer to that question. There have been near-tantrums when I refuse, but there are only so many times I can listen to our records! And everyone in the band is very inspirational for her—one day it’s “I wanna sing and play guitar like Ari.” The next it’s “I wanna play violin like Jenavieve;” and whenever she taps on anything, she’s “playing drums like TJ.” Man, it’s dangerous to ask open-ended questions to moms about their kids—I could probably quote her all day…


Theresa Andersson
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Song: “Birds Fly Away”

What are you thinking of naming your kid?
We wanted a name that works in the U.S. as well as my native Sweden. We’re thinking of Elsie.

How do you think having a child and being a mother will change the way you approach your career?
Well, it already has. I’m 32 weeks pregnant and in the middle of making a new record (check out my Kickstarter campaign). It slows me down a bit. I have to consider my baby’s needs. That said it is the most spiritual way to make a record. When I sing and play the baby responds by moving, she’s a big part of it.

What do you anticipate being the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Sharing my travel experiences around the world with my daughter will be incredible.

What do you anticipate being the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Changing the diapers in the van going down some bumpy road… The times when the whole family can’t be together will be hard. I’m currently strategizeing on how to get my husband to become my tour manager.

Rachel (Smith) Galloway
Danielson
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Song: “Did I Step on Your Trumpet?”

Names and ages of your kids:
Rosemary, age 10; Esther, age 7; Eleanor, age 4.

How does having children and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
Having children has definitely limited my availability to play shows with Danielson. My husband Jon plays in the band Soul Junk so he’s extremely supportive with the children when I fly to play a show or go on tour for a week. I have some amazing friends and family here who help me out a lot too. A week plus a couple days is my max to go on tour. I know what I can handle and what my girls can handle. My family always comes first; but that being said, sometimes it’s good for them for Mamma to go away for a short time and come back fired up to be a Mom again.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Being a musician is a lot of fun. I love singing and spending incredible time with my brother and sisters in a way most families don’t get to. And I love being a mom. In college when I was studying earning two degrees and working at an amazing internship opportunity I told my mother, “I never want to work just for money. This stinks.” I have always wanted to be a mom. It is the hardest job I have ever done and the most amazing one. The best part of being a “musician mom” is that my children and I sing and play instruments together all the time. I have a little nook by my fireplace where my guitar and ukulele hang on the wall to remind me to play everyday. Even when the girls don’t play with me, they hear me sing and they play around me while I sing. Music is a very integral part of their life and they probably don’t even realize it. I remember as a child that my brothers and sister and I would do the same thing as my father would sit and play his guitar in the living room almost every day. He would sit on the couch singing and playing his guitar and we would play, read, do our homework and coexist. The music was a daily presence and one that I know greatly impacted all of us in a positive way. Now I do the same thing with my children. I get such pleasure when I overhear one of the girls off in her corner and own little world singing to herself. I used to think this was commonplace, but as I get older I realize that most families don’t really do this.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
I want to do it all. And I can’t.

What do your kids think of your music?
My girls love the music. We play it all the time and they know all the words. Just recently, my daughter Rosemary was preparing for the Jog-A-Thon at her school and her gym teacher allowed the kids to bring in their music to listen to while they practiced jogging. She was comparing music with a friend and she noticed that he had both Danielson and Soul Junk music on his iPod. She told me that she yelled out, “Those are my mom and dad’s bands and they are really famous!” I had to laugh at that.

I think all the girls have decided that they are going to be in bands when they grow up. Of course, they also want to be designers and computer programmers too…so that probably just goes along with the territory. As for Jon and I, music is a very important part of our lives and we want to encourage that element to thrive in our daughters as well.


Ashton Shepherd
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Photo: MCA Nashville / Song: “Look It Up”

Name and age of your kid:
James, age 5 (and one on the way).

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
It changes it because it’s not all about you all the time. It’s funny to say that because you are in a world where you are out there fending for yourself, for yourself, trying to make your record work and your songs, but it’s all about them at the end of the day—even though it’s Ashton Shepherd that everyone sees. It’s about [my] family, my husband and my children.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Getting to do what I love because I love being a mamma. But like all mammas, like my music states that “I get a little bit ready to get the Friday Night Blues” like old John Conley used to say… you kind of want to go out and do something. I get to experience two worlds that are just really spectacular. I get to be a mamma when I’m at home and I get to do this extreme stuff on the other end.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Leaving home, leaving family and having to explain to my little boy when he says, “Well mamma, why do you have to leave so much?” He does really well with it, but even the smallest little question like that can make you feel so sad. But he’s grown enough and that’s just a wonderful feeling to be able to try and explain to him, but that’s the hardest part to try and explain to him why I do have to go on the road so much.

What does your kid think of your music?
Oh, James is my biggest fan; he is just so excited about getting out on the bus this year. He basically went to more than half of my shows in 2008 (and I did a lot of shows!) and he has been a part of it. He would sit on his Daddy’s shoulders and watch the shows. He plays drums, he has a set at home—he’s a HUGE part of my music.


Annie Hart
Au Revoir Simone, Pursesnatchers
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Song: “Falling Snow”

Name and age of your kid:
Henry, 5 months.

How has having a child and being a mother changed the way you approach your career?
Being a mom really makes you focus when you have a minute to spare, so you get a lot more done in your free time than you did before you had kids. Granted, there’s a lot less free time to be had, but it’s essential to make those minutes count.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Having a completely objective audience. Henry will smile and laugh at some songs I make up for him, and some he could care less about. The ones that don’t make him happy get moved to the wayside and the rest get moved to constant rotation and I try to think of grown-up-themed words to replace all the ‘lovebugs’ and ‘baby boys’ in there. The other great moments are when I park him in his bouncy seat next to the keyboard and he just sits and listens happily to me making up songs for a while. It’s very sweet and makes me feel so close to him.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Remember my answer to question number two? Being a mom makes me feel like I’m constantly on a leash with my time now. Sometimes it seems like as soon as I get on a roll writing or recording, the baby starts getting fussy and then I have to focus on his needs. I’m hoping this will make me more talented and able to knock out better material in a shorter amount of time.

What does your kid think of your music?
He loves it! He really likes Pursesnatchers and snaps to attention whenever he hears it. Au Revoir Simone totally relaxes him, though. I had a friend babysit for him and she played Still Night, Still Light, and he just calmed down and dozed away. We were touring that record when he was in the womb, so maybe it’s soothing for him in that regard. But he also loves Brian Eno and Popol Vuh so it might just be that he has a thing for synthesizers.


Alina Simone
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Song: “Half Of My Kingdom”

Name and age of your kid:
Zoe, six weeks old.

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
About two years ago, an editor who liked my music contacted me out of the blue asking whether I’d be interested in writing a book. At the time, my husband and I were just starting to think seriously about having a baby, and I knew that if we did, touring constantly wouldn’t really be sustainable (or much fun). So I spent the next year and a half writing a book of essays about trying to “make it” as an indie musician. It was definitely a conscious decision to branch out into a different direction creatively, one that would allow me to spend more time at home while introducing my music to a whole different audience. Hopefully my hilarifying stories of disastrous Craigslist auditions, dubious record deals and searching for my punk rock muse in the depths of Siberia (literally!) will enlighten music lovers in a whole new ways.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
1. Having a captive audience for all song ideas, good and bad.
2. Rock and roll onesies (a close second!)

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Babies, bars and loud music often don’t mix, which make scheduling and arranging childcare for rehearsals and shows the biggest challenges. Next month I am going on tour with my baby and my mom. Maybe this is a fun scenario if your mom happens to be Yoko Ono. Mine isn’t.

What does your kid think of your music?
My kid can’t talk so I can only assume she loves it.


Jill Andrews
The Everybodyfields
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Song: “Lonely Anywhere”

Name and age of your kid:
Nico, age 2 (at the end of May).

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
Having a child has made me treat my musical career with more respect. When it was just me, I knew I could get by on very little. Now I work very hard to support my son. If I have to be on the road and away from him, I am absolutely certain that it’ll be worth it.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
We sing and dance all around the house. I write new verses to Old McDonald. Nico is more interested in construction equipment than animals right now so we always add a verse about a backhoe.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
A lot of times being a musician means that I have to spend time away from Nico.

What does your kid think of your music?
It’s kind of hard to tell. I just asked him and he said “bug.”


Vesper Stamper
Ben + Vesper
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Song: “Receptor”

Names and ages of your kids:
Mango and Dervish. I’m kidding. They’re 8 and 5. So we’re in the full-on human formation stage now; no more baby-moon, but also more sleep.

How does having children and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
Do you really want to know? Listen, the gist of it is that it’s both killed my career and resurrected it. Before I had kids, I could be completely self-indulgent in life and art. That came through in the music. The music and art I make is, thankfully, far more authentic and necessary than it was before children. The problem is that I make a lot less of it than I did before, and than I feel the capacity for, and the industry’s transitional state makes it hard to do what’s required to be successful and also be a present parent (this is true in every industry where a mother tries to build a career). But I gladly do it because there are these little humans being formed on my watch, and I know that’s the greatest act of creativity there is. I’ll always find a way to sing, perform and record. It’s far more about the love of it now.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
The best part of being a musician mama (and this is total bliss) is watching my kids cultivate their own passion for creativity, in a home where there is only nurture for their creative pursuits, like an art incubator. Song and art making are just par for the course here, and I love that. It’s vital to me that they see their mother setting an example by constantly creating, working, struggling and not giving up, and not just doing things for them—eternally wiping their behinds, as it were. I hope they will be far more daring than I am. I also hope they’ll figure out how to make lots of money with their art. Or go the easy route and become brain surgeons.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Again, you could say the following about any career; replace “music” with “publishing” or “finance.” The hardest part is that I feel my loyalties being constantly pulled in two directions: humans and work. Also, reviewers seem obsessed with us being ‘parents that make music,’ and not simply musicians. One fellow that didn’t know we were parents gave us a scathing review in which he suggested we “go away and have some kids.” Dude, you kiss your mother with that mouth? I guess it’s because as much as we like to deny it, music is a carefree-youth-and-skinny-beauty game. Whoever sold us this lie as women that we could ‘have it all’—career, family, eternal beauty—I want to throttle her. I’m sure she was an heiress with a nanny and a $1,200 stroller. But when I’m tempted to play the ‘if only’ game, I often have to pull back and think: in the long run, what will matter? That I sang? That I sold records? That I looked cute and sad? That people liked me? Or that I learned how to love well in a way that will probably not have much pay ‘back’, but hopefully more pay ‘forward?’

What do your kids think of your music?
I don’t know how my kids feel about my music, as in having an actual opinion about it. They definitely know it all by heart, so they’re listening. But music and art are just such a part of our family life that they probably take it for granted—which is a-okay with me. They should take it for granted. We were all meant to live lives filled with beauty.

Lynn Truell
Imperial Teen
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Song: “Yoo Hoo”

Names and ages of your kids:
Lily, age 7; Jake, age 6; Lukas age 3.

How does having children and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
The amount of time it takes to run and household and take care of three small children is something I had never realized. That said, finding time to write and practice has been mostly difficult for me. Although I do have a small studio in my basement, being left alone for more than 10 minutes can be hard with everyone home. I find the best stuff comes out of me when I have an idea and run down to the basement and get it on tape, or I try and get a drumbeat on the spot; it is very random and impulsive.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Being a musician and a mom is cool for me and cool for my kids. They like having the instruments around. I like sharing my past—songs and photos and videos—with them, although they don’t seem very impressed. Other moms seem to like that I’m a musician.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
It is nearly impossible for me to tour for any length of time—couple of days at most.

What do your kids think of your music?
They like some of the poppy songs a lot, but as I stated earlier…well, I wish they were more impressed—they think all that happened in the ‘olden days!’


Kate O’Brien-Clarke
AgesandAges
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Song: “No Nostalgia”

Name and age of your kid:
Nils Patrick, 8 months.

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
I’ve always tried to maintain a balanced life—music, relationships, good health, earning money. I have a history of taking on more projects than is normal for one person. Now, with our son in the mix, I have to say no to things in order to maintain balance. At risk of sounding like Tiger Mother, he does not always come first. Sometimes I do. I wholeheartedly agree that a happy and healthy Mom helps to create a happy and healthy child. I must continue to create music and spend time with my violin or else it all goes to hell, which of course negatively affects Nils. At the end of the day, whatever energy I expend must have a positive and fruitful return.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Setting a living example for my son that art is necessary and possible. I sleep soundly at night knowing our boy has parents who walk their talk. My husband Jay is Ash Black Bufflo and also plays in Dolorean and Grails.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Well so far… making it work to tour. Ask me again in a year and who knows what I’ll say.

What does your kid think of your music?
Well, he’s only eight months old but I swear I’ve seen him smile and laugh at certain tunes and not others. But who knows what he really thinks?


Rebekah Goode-Peoples
Oryx and Crake
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Photo: Max Blau / Song: “Fun Funeral”

Names and ages of your kids:
Sebastian Rhys, age 7 ¾; Isobel Laurence, age 2.

How does having children and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
When you have kids, there are a limited number of hours that you can spend on your own creative work, especially when you still have a day job. There are many things I’d love to do and would love to make time for, like knitting or writing novels or going to grad school, but I don’t because I want to be a great mom. You have to be really, really choosy. I chose music—or music chose me—and so, besides mothering and teaching, that’s what I do. All the time.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
My husband and I write all the music together and play in the band together, so we’re modeling a certain kind of partnership for our kids. They see us being creative together and spending our time making music rather than watching TV, and they’ve followed suit. I love feeling like I’ve played some part in encouraging them to pursue their own passions and spend their time meaningfully.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
When you’re about to go on stage, and you realize you have kid shmutz all over your dress—drool, throw-up, chocolate milk—I’ve performed wearing it all. But seriously… Touring. The idea of doing more extensive touring is both fantastic and terrifying. I love music and I love my band. But my first commitment is to my children. My dream is to make like Sonic Youth or Mates of State and take the kids on the road with us. My husband and I are both teachers by trade, so we could definitely educate them while touring. It would be a chaotic and amazing adventure.

Also, I need more sleep. A lot more sleep.

What do your kids think of your music?
They must like something about it because they want to play music all the time themselves. Sebastian creates very Daft Punkish songs in Garage Band and listens to everything from Bowie to Bieber to Bon Iver on his headphones. Izzy sings “Lullaby #1” with me every night before bed. She sang songs before she said sentences—probably because she was slung to me during our practices for the first year of her life. And she should probably stick to songs because her first sentence, after falling on her booty in the bath, was “What the hell!”

I’m clearly doing a standup job as a mom.


Olof Arnalds
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Photo: Max Blau / Song: “Surrender”

Name and age of your kid:
Ari, age 3.

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
It’s made me more focused and task oriented as I no longer have all the time in the world to myself.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
The playfulness.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Not being able to have uninterrupted sleep during the hours that I like sleeping in.

What does your kid think of your music?
I don’t know. I don’t play my own material around the house and prefer to work and practice in solitude.


Kelli Scarr
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Song: “Break Up”

Name and age of your kid:
Liam, age 4.

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
Watching a human grow every day right before my eyes makes me think of each new musical endeavor or song as a part of a life’s work. His sense of wonder is contagious. I am approaching music with a wider lens.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
The best part is the heightened respect I feel from my peers and the support of the musician-parent community that surrounds me.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
The most difficult part is missing each other when I’m out on the road. During a recent tour I called home to check in and Liam started crying and was asking when I’d be coming back. I told him that I’d be home in four days, to which he replied, “Mommy, I don’t know what four days is!” My heart just about broke.

What does your kid think of your music?
He isn’t quite old enough to articulate his thoughts on music, but I can definitely tell that he gravitates towards the more uptempo stuff—songs he can dance to. Sadly, most of my mid-tempo songs don’t fit into this category. Liam would be stoked if I made an entire album that sounded like Kanye West’s “American Boy.”


Caithlin De Marrais
Rainer Maria
demarrais.jpg

Song: “Artificial Light”

Name and age of your kid:
Oscar, age 2 1/2.

How does having a child and being a mother change the way you approach your career?
I take more risks with my music. I jump into new things without the hesitation I might have felt before. It’s helped me believe in something bigger than myself, so you also could say I’ve been humbled by the experience.

What’s the best part about being both a musician and a mom?
Sharing my love and experience of music with my son.

What’s the most difficult part about being both a musician and a mom?
Being patient.

What does your kid think of your music?
My son is a little too young to ask him, but he does ask me to take out my bass guitar and play along to my songs while he jumps around on the couch, stopping on occasion to give me a vice-like hug around my neck. I think that means he likes it.

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