21 Artists Share Their Favorite Horror Movies

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21 Artists Share Their Favorite Horror Movies

We’ve all got different relationships with our favorite horror movies. Some are delighted by an on-screen gorefest, but for others, it can be a thoughtful look at the human condition, illuminating all kinds of fears stowed within us. Either way, it’s Halloween—that time of year again when these films really shine. We asked 20 artists to share their favorite horror films, and you can let us know yours in the comment box below.

1. Russ Manning (Rush Midnight, Twin Shadow)

1. The Exorcist
This is one of the first horror movies I watched….The makeup is supreme and this actress Linda Blair totally nails both innocence and evil.

2. Ringu
I couldn’t turn on the television when by myself for about week after watching this one. This is the original; darker and more suspenseful than the American remake.

3. Halloween 2
Michael Myers is a machine who can lift nurses off of the ground with one hand and withstand boiling water in the name of murder. He’s a unique immortal and we’re afraid because we have no [way to] sympathize with him.

4. REC
Although some of these zombies look more like circus freaks, just wait for the ending! There is no hope and this is that classic non-Hollywood narrative where no one escapes.

5. Paranormal Activity 3
Just watched this recently and luckily I have company at night. There’s nothing scarier than to watch a character you once sympathized with transform into the demon that lives in the basement. No soundtrack and a stationary camera help create a unique surveillance of horror.

6. The Silence of the Lambs
I once hung out with Jody Foster and she’s fun!

7. Candyman
Candyman among others inspired me and my friends to stand in front of the mirror and turn off the lights and hope our pants stay dry. Philip Glass’ score adds some true class to this movie, elevating it above many ‘90s horror flicks.

8. 28 Days Later
The motion-jitter effect used in this one is super effective. The consistent cold color palette and Godspeed You! Black Emperor opening song grabbed my attention. Not the most original plotline and a slightly too-good-to-be-true ending, but one of the most beautiful zombie movies I’ve ever watched.

9. The Amityville Horror (1977)
The opening theme is the creepiest ever. Again, nothing scares me more than little girls’ haunted spirits. While AH no longer has me jumping off my chair, I’m sure in 1978 it was the most bad ass date movie. Its probably one of the most recycled stories in history.

10. Stephen King’s IT
I’ve always hated clowns so this movie really cuts the cake. Part one is worth seeing, in which innocent children are tormented by their worst fears, embodied by this horrendous clown. This one challenges pure innocent and frailty against true evil.


2. Sergio Trevino (Buxton)

Favorite Horror Movie:
Event Horizon

When did you first experience the movie?
17

What’s the scariest scene?
When Sam Neil rips his eyes out (at this point I only knew him as the doctor from Jurassic Park.)

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
I guess isolation. I refuse to watch it again, can’t say why.

Why is this scarier than any other horror movie out there?
I think it just caught me in a vulnerable position. And it always throws me for a whirl when the protagonist becomes the antagonist. It’s like “Hey I like this guy. Wait, no I don’t….what happened to his eyes? We’re not in Jurassic Park anymore!”


3. Aaron Beam (Red Fang)

Favorite Horror Movie:
The Shining

When did you first experience the movie?
I was probably 13 or 14 when I first saw pieces of it, but I never made it all the way through until I was maybe 24. Too scary!

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
Probably when the kid goes into the bathroom to see what is in the bathtub.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
Discovering a mutilated body.

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
Because it was made by a true master of cinema and does not rely solely on suspense or horror movie gimmicks. Rather, it explores basic human fears and makes them corporeal. It is more about mental illness and its effects on relationships than cheap thrills.


4. Kevin Sharp (Brutal Truth/Primate/Venomous Concept)

Favorite Horror Movie:
Camp Rock II

How old were you when you first saw the movie?
43

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
When Demi Lovato started to tearing up with these feeling things

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
Joe Jonas playing guitar and emoting feelings

Why is this scarier than any other horror movie out there?
‘Cause they have record deals….


5. Slam Donahue

I got into the horror movie game late. I’d watch through my fingers, telling/shrieking at my brother to switch off Jason, Freddy, Michael, Candy Man, whoever. So, excuse my plebeian tastes as this is more a list of which movies terrified me and not a list of the best gore fantasy.

1. Alien
Male rape. (Ed.—He’s referring to this.)

2. It
I can’t stand to look at Stephen King now without shuddering a bit. When I was a child, hearing the name alone would send me shivering up into my room and under the blankets. This film made me scared of clowns, spiders and John Ritter (RIP) all in one go.

3. Jason Goes To Hell: The Final Friday
This was one of those movies that somehow existed on a random VHS at my parent’s house for as long as I can remember. Taped off HBO, it had the old Home Box Office bumpers intact, I would blind fast forward through it since inexplicably Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure was the second film on the tape. I’d push the dusty tape in and hit fast forward and look away with all my might. Once, misjudging the time, I hit play looked back and a guy was eating Jason’s black beating heart.

4. Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure
This was my reward for blind firing through Jason. But only the first hour, then Pee-Wee has to deal with Francis, evil clowns, a demon/ghost truck driver, that shitty older brother from The Wonder Years, and I believe a rodeo somewhere in there—I was already on to playing Sega Genesis at this point.

5. Cube
Once when I had to flu in middle school, I woke up from my fever in the middle of Cube playing on the television. Delirious, I thought I imagined it and told everyone of my insane dream. Shifting rooms, people being impaled, terrible dialogue, all things my virus-fighting brain might hallucinate. Years later, I almost had an existential breakdown when I saw Cube 2: Hypercube on the shelf at Blockbuster Video. How did they make a sequel to my dream?


6. Chuck Whistler (Chamberlin)

Favorite Horror Movie:
  The Evil Dead

When did you first experience the movie?
Too young, I was about 12 or 13. Whereas most people had teachers and coaches as role models I only had Bruce Campbell, that thick-browed exemplar of all things masculine. And that’s BEFORE he played an aging Elvis Presley battling mummies in rural Texas. It wasn’t much to work with, but I seemed to have made it through my pre-teens (relatively) unscathed. Heck, the first time I ever got drunk I watched the third film in the series, and to this day I’m still into Labatt Blue and dudes with chainsaws in place of missing limbs.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
Probably the one where the girl gets raped by possessed trees.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
Probably my fear of getting raped by possessed trees.

Why is this scarier than any other horror movie out there?
In all seriousness, Sam Raimi’s entire Evil Dead trilogy is biblical in its importance to independent film, horror and horror-comedy alike. The original Evil Dead was a seminal progenitor of the low budget (or nowadays faux-low budget) horror genre. Much like the Old Testament it’s a bizarre, somewhat alienating and legitimately frightening tale of possession—good and evil—and the horrors of the ancient world. In addition it’s particularly resonant to someone who actually lives in cabin in the woods, and my personal favorite film in the series. The visual composition of the film screams amateur film buff nerd-dom in the best possible way, and its twisted, minimalist, and almost punk-rock take on the horror genre is simply unmatched.

Its sequel, Evil Dead II, turns the original completely on its head. Our hero (once again impeccably portrayed by Bruce Campbell) now reaches comic book levels of heroism in his now superhuman struggle with the dark forces within, providing the Christ-figure in our New Testament. Similarly adopting a much more lighthearted tone than the stoic original, the genre-bending film is seamlessly and intentionally interwoven with humor and b-movie level action hyperbole, thereby making it much more palatable for the masses. It’s truly the Gospel according to Sam Raimi, and easily the most widely adopted sect among the three.

For better or worse, the third film in the series, Army of Darkness (1992), our Book of Mormon if you will, is at first glance unrelated to the other films. In fact, Army of Darkness and the Book of Mormon both share the same beginning wherein our hero is magically transported to a completely different time and continent entirely! There, the battle between good and evil resumes. The tone of the film completes the transition towards pure comedy that began with Evil Dead II. I’ll leave that religious metaphor in the hands of the reader. Suffice it to say the film remains a welcome and important addition to the trilogy, completing the yin and yang of horror/comedy, and cementing the series’ place in the nerdy-fanboy-obscure-cult pantheon.


7. Mel Mongeon (Fuck the Facts)

Favorite Horror Movie:
Inside (2007)

When did you first experience the movie?
It was about 3 years ago, so I was definitely an adult! We watched it after band practice, only our drummer wasn’t there. We all enjoyed it

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
Near the end when the ‘’crazy’’ lady performs a caesarian section and pulls the baby out of the mothers womb it is so intense. We were all really vocal at that moment at about how gross it was. I remember feeling a little sick to my stomach as well.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
It is fictional but not surrealistic. I think that’s why it has more of an impact I was pregnant the year after and it didn’t give me nightmares. Nobody tried to steal anything straight from my womb so that’s a good thing.

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
It has the right balance of suspense, tasteful goriness with a nice touch of drama. The French know how to direct and produce good movies!


8. Phil Duboi-Coyne (Revocation)

Favorite Horror Movie:
Event Horizon

When did you first experience the movie? How old were you?
I was pretty young when I first saw Event Horizon, probably around 11 or 12. I remember having to smuggle it out of the video store in a power rangers VHS sleeve

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
Either the scene where the hallucinated son with chewed up legs runs his hand on the inside of the tent, or when Dr. Weir’s wife pops up in the maintenance tunnel. That bugged me out as a kid

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
I once had a really bad experience with inter-dimensional deep space travel, so this movie really resonated with me. It’s spooky out there…

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
I don’t know if Event Horizon is necessarily better or scarier than other horror movies I’ve seen, it was just one of my gateway horror movies that holds a lot of nostalgic value. I’ve probably seen it over 50 times, its just one if those movies I have to leave on if I see it. At this point its more of a comedy to me.


9. Matthew Widener (Liberteer, Cretin, The County Medical Examiners)

Favorite Horror Movie:
The Exorcist

When did you first experience the movie?
I was 12 years old. I watched it through fingers over my eyes, in the dark, while my mom slept on the couch. Near the end of the movie, during the final exorcism scene, my mom jerked in her sleep and cried out and I almost made poo everywhere.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
Many contenders, but the one that kills me most is the crucifix masturbation scene. The unthinkable and grotesque rebellion, against God and mother, is horrifying in a fundamental way. I was an atheist even as a kid, but having gone to Catholic school, the imagery triggers so much.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
Well, I don’t believe in demons or ghosts or anything. My personal fear is an unease that is tied into the absence of those things. The Exorcist is scary to me because it underlines the fiction of that worldview, reminds me of our lack of meaning, but at the same time slaps me around with the “what if” and assaults me from both sides. It’s terrifying imagining someone you know and love becoming like that.

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
It’s transgressive in a way that most movies never are. It feels like a documentary, but without the cloying pander of the modern found footage bullshit. The sound design, the acting, the writing, it’s all so perfect.


10. Marissa Martinez (Cretin/Repulsion)

Favorite Horror Movie:
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre(Original)

When did you first experience the movie?
It was the summer before starting my senior year of high school. So, either 16 or 17. Widener and I had been working on music for our band, when I told him that I had never seen The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. The lyrical concept for Cretin was inspired by the characters in this movie, so I was told that it was required viewing. We immediately drove to the local video rental shop so I could see it.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
The scariest scene to me, is when Pam gets hung up on the meat hook by Leatherface. I constantly live with a fear of being manhandled by someone bigger than me. A fear of being at their mercy, being tossed around against my will. Unable to fightback to any effect, and then in the blink of an eye, finding myself in pain, bleeding and helpless.

The actress’ performance is extremely convincing. When she’s impaled on that hook and goes from hysterics, to stunned silence, with a look of shock on her face as she realizes what just happened. Then struggling to lift herself off of the hook, her screams reduced to strained, breathless, whimpers, trailing off until she surrenders to defeat… It’s really horrifying…

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
I grew up in the Santa Cruz, Calif., mountains which was home to a couple of serial killers back in the late ‘70s. There were also secluded towns out there, which we all understood, through urban legend, to be very “backwoods” and frightening. Widener and I often imagined that these places played host to characters straight out of movies like Deliverance or The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. So, whenever we were out late at night driving through the mountains, our pulses would beat a little faster than usual. Our senses would be on alert as we feared for that inevitable moment where we were booby trapped by a cackling, feral, miscreant, and his gigantic, lumbering, friend.

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
The acting in this movie is really good. The terror expressed by all of the victims is so realistic it’s palpable. The cretanic performances of the murderous family are brilliant too. Plus, this movie has has it all! A creepy secluded shack, filled with furniture made out of people. A wild, scampering, cretin who plays with roadkill. Murder, meat hooks and mental torture, all building to a moving waltz between a monstrous, gender-bending, maniac, and his beloved chainsaw of death. It just doesn’t get any better than that…


11. Joe Frabotta (Evil Eyes)

Favorite Horror Movie:
Gremlins

When did you first experience the movie?
I was around 5-6 years old, watched it at home with my parents and brother.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
The kitchen scene. Gremlins blended. Gremlins microwaved. Gremlins stabbed. All by a maniacal mother.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
The gremlins kind of look resemble a cross between a spider and a scorpion. Both are my arch enemies.

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
Gremlins was supposed to be family friendly (horror), which is why I saw it. Looking back, it was pretty freaky. And how can you not like Gizmo? He’s the boss.

Lesson learned: Never purchase a weird, furry, rare animal from a Chinese antique store. Actually, always do that.


12. Greg Mabry (Evil Eyes)

Favorite Horror Movie:
The Shining

When did you first experience the movie?
I was probably 12 or so. I remember watching it with my dad and literally getting so freaked out that I didn’t sleep well for weeks.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
So many scenes in this film still can make my skin crawl, but the scene where the kid is riding his tricycle down the hallway and encounters the twin girls is crazy. It flashes between images of them murdered and then standing there in blue dresses. They’re asking the boy to come play with them, forever. The scene with the blood rushing out of the elevator is also classic.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
Yeah, I used to live in a haunted farm house in Tennessee. I never believed in ghosts but it was undeniably haunted by a young female ghost. It was pretty spooky.

Why is this better/scarier than any other horror movie out there?
Stanley Kubrick  is one of my favorite directors, and everything in the film is top notch: the actors, the cinematography, the special effects, every detail is executed perfectly. Not only is it visually frightening, it’s also haunting psychologically. “Here’s Johnny!”

It’s that time of year again when horror films truly shine. We asked 20 artists to share their favorites, and you can let us know yours in the comment box below.


13. Madi Diaz

Favorite Horror Movie:
Sometimes They Come Back

When did you first experience the movie?
I was sleeping over at my friend Maureen’s house when I was six or seven and we weren’t supposed to be watching TV but…it was a sleepover. of course we snuck out and watched TV.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
The scene that i can remember the most clearly is when the main character walks into an old barn and there’s a girl hanging from the rafters of the barn with her tongue hanging out of her mouth. wearing a plaid shirt. So ‘90s.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
Being haunted by a dead younger brother is definitely totally creepy. Any child in a horror movie. The image stays with me way longer than I’d ever want it to.

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
It’s definitely not better or scarier than most horror movies but if you’re seven it’ll haunt you for the rest of your life. Which i guess means that it’s doing it’s job…if you’re seven.


14. Moselle Spiller (Crushed Out)

Favorite Horror Movie:
Alien

As a kid my parents limited My exposure to TV and popular movies, I think I first started watching MTV in eigth grade. My mother would bring home movies from the public library like Anne of Green Gables and National Velvet

The first horror movie that I recall being seriously affected by would be Alien with Sigourney Weaver. I was about 11 years old in 1995 when I watched it on TV at a slumber party with other little girls, complete with all the ads coming in right before the best parts.

The scariest, most powerful scene for me is the stalking of Ridley by the Alien creature in the spaceship’s industrial hallways, mostly due to the incredible sound effects. Sounds of claws on metal and dripping fluids, they were organic yet industrial. I have a fear of being trapped in an industrial machine world, and a spaceship would be one of them. I also don’t like insects and the Alien is very insect-like.

For me this is still scarier than present day horror due to the late ‘70s puppetry and lack of CGI. There is an organic sculptural art to the Alien’s horrible head and its body movements that can’t be captured with computer renderings. For me its sort of like recording analog or digital, I like the analog whenever possible.


15. Rachel Kolar – (He’s My Brother, She’s My Sister)

Favorite Horror Movie:
Halloween

Halloween! Hands down. I started my obsession with horror films when I was in second grade. I loved sleepovers and watching gruesome movies. The problem was, I was very much alone in this endeavor. All of my friends were terrified of Halloween, not to mention most parents didn’t endorse such extreme violence at such a young age. I grew up a prankster so I love anything that scares people. In the middle of the film I would usually say I was going to the bathroom and then creep back into the room and spook everyone. Little girls cry easily, so this usually resulted in tears. Halloween is the best because of the score and the expressionless killer. Michael Myers is so freaky because he has no reaction as he is massacring his victims. I think I liked the sexy scenes too. I guess I’ve always been a little pervvy too!


16. Rob Kolar – (He’s My Brother, She’s My Sister)

Favorite Horror Movie:
The Omen

I remember seeing this as a kid and finding the music and subtleties of the suspense and horror really terrifying. The idea of a child being the villain, not to mention the antichrist also stirred some real fear into my 12-year-old mind. The cinematography and acting was also really haunting. Sometimes it isn’t the gore which makes your heart skip a beat, but the anticipation of who will die.


17. Dana Falconberry
Favorite Horror Movie: Funny Games
Favorite Horror Movie: Funny Games
When did you first experience the movie?
On the night of my 29th birthday. Horrible ending to a good birthday.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
The never-ending long shot in the living room when all the shit goes down. Or the scene at the beginning where the dude asks for an egg and stands there creeping out while the woman gets it for him.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
Recently my band and I camped in the redwoods on a west coast tour. We sang six part harmony around the campfire for a while, and every so often people would come up and ask if they could listen. At around 2 a.m. a car pulled up and started setting up camp across from us. A little while later they came to our campsite, three tall and thin dudes with super blonde hair, and sat down. They said they weren’t from around there and that they were very interested in what we were doing. They asked us how old we were. They asked us to play them a whole song from start to finish. They sat there staring us, unmoving and stoic as we played, and when we finished they said nothing and nodded. My bass player, Chris and I were the only ones in the band that had seen Funny Games, and we were both having internal panic attacks. The rest of the band thought they were charming and a little weird, but Chris and were totally freaking out. Finally they disappeared back into their campsite and left us alone for the night. This is one of many experienced I’ve had since watching this movie where I’m absolutely convinced that I’m going to have to live the plot.

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
I don’t know that I would say that this movie is better than other horror movies. I don’t even know if I like it! I think I might hate it. But it’s the scariest thing I’ve ever seen, and it still terrifies me on a very deep and real level even though I haven’t watched it again (and never will)! The long continuous shots are the most uncomfortable scenes ever, and the villains are ridiculously convincing. It’s very well made (except for that crappy rewind thing in the middle!) and even beautiful at times. So yeah, it’s got all the essential components to make itself a superb horror movie, but I wouldn’t watch it if I were you.


18. James Jackson Toth (Wooden Wand)
Favorite Horror Movie: The Shining
When did you first experience the movie?
I had a great dad, but the only thing he did that could be considered ‘abusive’ was force my sisters and I to watch movies that were way, way too, err, delicate for our young minds. The Shining is the one that sticks out in my memory, for obvious reasons. I was about eight or nine when he showed it to me, around the same age as the character of Danny Torrance in the film. The Grady twins haunted my nightmares for years afterward.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
At the time, I would have said that the scariest scenes were the ones involving those ghostly Grady daughters, or the scene in room 237 in which the beautiful woman in the bathtub transforms into the creepy cackling corpse, but as an adult, it is the sheer surrealism of the ‘pig mask’ scene that gives me the heebie jeebies. Though the unwholesome scene is explained somewhat in the book, in the movie it is presented without context, and is even creepier as a result, very vividly capturing nightmare logic better than any film before or since.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
Oh, yes. Cabin fever is a very real thing, and I think there’s a little Overlook Hotel in all of us. As far as onscreen depictions of descents into madness go, people have been using Nicholson’s Torrance as a model for years. Though the book takes great pains to portray the Overlook as a cause of madness and not merely a catalyst, the Kubrick / Nicholson version of Torrance is a man who seems pretty prone to lunacy from the jump, with the Hotel providing the necessary nudge. Whether a directorial liberty or a misreading of the character, it nevertheless makes for fascinating cinema, as each scene finds Torrance visibly plummeting deeper into oblivion, until the final scene, in which he’s literally reduced to a snarling, seething animal stalking his prey.

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
It is the only horror film I still probably wouldn’t watch by myself before bedtime. I miss being frightened by movies. Like the excitement of Christmas or the anticipation of a birthday, feeling genuinely afraid of The Wolfman or Frankenstein or Dracula is a magical feeling that gradually fades without warning as you grow older, when your nightmares start involving medical bills and lung cancer and shit. But The Shining is a movie that still scares me, because the monster in The Shining is not a werewolf or a zombie, but the theoretical dormant maniac in all of us, just waiting for the right setting and set of circumstances to invoke itself and wreak unholy havoc on our loved ones. That’s some grownup kinda scary right there.


19. Alicia Gbur (FAWN)

Favorite Horror Movie:
House

A couple years ago, there was this place in Detroit’s Cass Corridor called the Burton Theatre (it’s now called the Corktown Theatre and you should check it out). Anyway, they show all sorts of crazy stuff that’s fun to see on a head full of booze or whatever else suits your fancy. A film that really stands out is House. Not to be confused with the ridiculous string of comedy-horror movies from the ‘80s (which, admittedly, scared the shit out of us when we were young), this is a Japanese piece from the mid-70s. Basically, you’ve got a bunch of young Asian gals getting TORE UP by a haunted house. Crazy analog special effects make this the horror genre’s answer to Bruce Haack’s Electric Lucifer. Watch it and you’ll never look at a piano the same way again.


20. Michael Jirkovsky (Social Studies)
Favorite Horror Movie: The Shining

When did you first experience the movie?
As a teenager I watched The Shining in a friend’s living room during a particularly cold Chicago winter. It was snowing outside and I had no notion of what the film contained.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
I love the scene when Shelly Duvall’s character discovers Jack Nicholson’s “manuscript”. The soundtrack builds tension with high strings as Wendy unravels Jack’s instability. With each repetition of “all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” Wendy feels greater uncertainty about the man she married. It’s the turning point in the film. Everything you thought you knew is false. Your darkest thoughts couldn’t prepare you for the terror of reality.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
The Shining thrives by suggesting a subcutaneous evil. Beneath the world we take for granted lives an unimaginable darkness, either supernatural or psychological. I don’t believe that’s true but it’s a terrifying thought nonetheless. Also, hedge mazes freak me out.

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
I now assume all hotel elevators will deliver a river of blood. Take the stairs!


21. Kyle Field (Little Wings)
Favorite Horror Movie: The Boy who Cried Werewolf

When did you first experience the movie?
It was on TV and my babysitter was watching it, I think it was getting close to Halloween.

How old were you? I was five.

What’s the scariest scene in the movie?
There is a scene where the werewolf (who is actually his father) punches a hole In the garage door and a hairy claw bursts out right by the boy’s head.

Are there any personal fears that resonate with you in this movie?
Besides the obvious, I had a secret fear when I was 4-5 years old. In my active imagination I thought that there was a chance that my parents were devils with dark short hair covering their entire bodies and that they had human suits that covered them entirely. I was afraid to catch them snoozing without their earthling body masks on!

Why is this better than any other horror movie out there?
For me it doesn’t actually hold up anymore, but to my five year old self it was really significant. I feel like I enjoy The Shining every time I see it. When Kubrick passed to the other side I was in Portland mixing an album and got to see it at the Baghdad Theatre, seeing it huge was big for me!

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