The 100 Best Comic Book Characters of All Time

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The 100 Best Comic Book Characters of All Time

When you flip through a comic book, you’re looking at a medium that has existed for less than a century. Within those approximate 80 years, comic book stories and the avatars within have graduated from the scrutiny of child psychologists to multimedia empires that annually generate billions of dollars. Arguably, we’re in a golden age: the legacy characters of Marvel and DC have the support of the largest companies in the world, while any writer or artist can transform their own compelling cast into a creator-owned foundation, stewarding the most innovative intellectual properties forward (hello Saga and The Walking Dead).

With so many stories and characters out there, what still resonates and drives us to the comic store every Wednesday? The Paste staff decided to dig deep into their long boxes to identify the faces who shaped some of the most compelling narratives in sequential art. Quantifying characters from such a wide range of genres and eras was undeniably difficult, but a good story is universal. We guarantee that any one of these heroes, villains, lovers or fighters has earned their immortality in comic book history.

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1dodgefinal.jpg 100. Lucas “Dodge” Caravaggio
First Appearance: Locke & Key #1
Best Writer: Joe Hill
Best Artist: Gabriel Rodriguez

Locke & Key centers on the members of the Locke family, who move into patriarch Rendell’s old New England home in the wake of his grisly murder. The overarching Big Bad of the series comes in the form of an ancient demon who’s entwined with the soul of Dodge, Rendell’s childhood friend. For close to 40 issues, the demon-possessed Dodge wreaks havoc not only in the lives of the Locke children, but anyone even tangentially related to them, all in relentless pursuit of the Omega Key. While comics have no shortage of great demonic characters, it’s Dodge’s unique, twisted brand of cruelty that makes him one of the greats. — Mark Rozeman

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99. Adam Warlock
First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #66
Best Writer: Roy Thomas
Best Artist: Gil Kane

Some of the characters on this list are here because they have become a template or trope for other heroes and villains. Adam Warlock’s role is rooted in un-assimilated weirdness, and little of that has changed in the space god’s 47 years. Yes, with his tendency for cocoon-hatching resurrections, early storylines hint at more than a few Christ parallels, but over time, the character has settled into a near-unique role as a fill-in-the-blank protagonist in any story with cosmic undertones or stakes. — Michael Burgin

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1suziefinal.png 98. Suzie
First Appearance: Sex Criminals #1
Best Writer: Matt Fraction 
Best Artist: Chip Zdarsky

One of the most interesting comic characters we’ve seen in recent years doesn’t fly. She doesn’t have x-ray vision or scale buildings or fight bad guys. She does, however, stop time with her earth-rocking orgasms, and that’s pretty much all you need to know to get the gist of the very hilarious Sex Criminals by Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky. Suzie — a sexually liberated librarian who robs banks while in her post-climax “quiet” — is more than you could ask for in the role of Sex Criminals’s deeply troubled (and hilarious, and real) lead character, and she forever sets an example for selfish dudes to be considerate. While Suzie’s conflicted about robbing banks, she’s doing it in the spirit of Robin Hood to give back to her own troubled library. Guys, maybe the special lady in your life could rob banks if you just gave her the extra 50-to-75 percent. — Tyler Kane

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1tankgirlfinal.jpg 97. Tank Girl
First Appearance: Deadline #1
Best Writer & Artist: Jamie Hewlett

Long before visualizing the cartoon anarchists of Gorillaz with Damon Albarn, British artist Jamie Hewlett devised the perfect grrrl power counterculture icon in Tank Girl. A blinding reflection of the punk groundswell that greeted former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s ultra-conservative legislation, Tank Girl occupied a series of underground comic strips before writers like Peter Milligan cast her in long-form comics and graphic novels. A gorgeous, gratuitous veneer of post-apocalyptic guns ’n ammo excess, Tank Girl evolved the gritty 2001 AD formula with a needed dose of estrogen. — Sean Edgar & Caitlin McGurk

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1tonychufinal.jpg 96. Tony Chu
First Appearance: Chew #1
Best Writer: John Layman
Best Artist: Rob Guillory

Chew embraces one of the more eye-raising concepts in recent years — a Philadelphia FDA agent draws psychic impressions from whatever he eats to solve crimes, even if it means biting into the occasional human body part now and then. Such a bonkers premise necessitates a great protagonist to keep the story anchored in an emotional reality, and Tony Chu is the man for the job. He’s a fiercely intelligent, grounded character in a world full of crazies. Tony also represents a pleasant oddity in comics — he’s a Chinese-American hero who’s neither a hacker nor ninja/samurai stereotype; in a medium where minority heroes remain unfortunately minimal, Tony is a delightful exception. — Mark Rozeman

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1lyingcatfinal.jpg 95. Lying Cat
First Appearance: Saga #1
Best Writer: Brian K. Vaughan
Best Artist: Fiona Staples 

Don’t be fooled into believing Lying Cat is nothing more than a glorified polygraph. Sure, she only speaks one word — “lying” — whenever she witnesses someone bend the truth, but she also possesses unfathomable depths of loyalty. Lying Cat fights for the individuals she cares about, whether that entails sacrificing an eye in battle or nurturing former child sex slave Sophie:
1sophieandlyingcat.jpg She makes us weep; she makes us cheer and snort with laughter. In Lying Cat, we find extraordinary heroism in the guise of the quirkiest sidekick. —Frannie Jackson

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1antonarcanefinal.jpg 94. Anton Arcane
First Appearance: Swamp Thing #1
Best Writer: Len Wein
Best Artist: Berni Wrightson

It’s not often that heroes get to stare into the eyes of the villains who killed them — okay, maybe it is — but there was a special brand of evil in the heart of Swamp Thing’s nemesis. Anton Arcane, like Spider-Man’s Venom, is terrifying because he doesn’t take a form you can just kill or send to a supervillain prison. We’ve seen him take on many different forms since Swamp Thing #1 in 1972 — an old man, a demon from Hell, Swamp Thing himself and the recent protector of The Rot (or basically everything that’s dead) — but the same always remains for Alec Holland’s fly-infested foe: he’s a brilliant manipulator with a soul of pure darkness. — Tyler Kane

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1flycatcherfinal.gif 93. Flycatcher
First Appearance: Fables #1
Best Writer: Bill Willingham
Best Artist: Mark Buckingham

Frankly, if you’re a recurring character in Bill Willingham’s Fables, there’s probably an argument to be made to put you on this list. The series is so well-written and the characters so well fleshed-out … if you don’t belong here it’s likely just because Willingham hasn’t gotten to you yet. Still, some arcs stand out, such as the journey of Flycatcher (also known as the Frog Prince or Prince Ambrose) from humble janitor to an Adversary-thwarting king. Bigby Wolf may give the Fables series much of its punch, but Flycatcher is its undeniable heart. — Michael Burgin

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1hitmanfinal.jpg 92. Tommy Monaghan
First Appearance: The Demon Annual Vol. 3 #2
Best Writer: Garth Ennis
Best Artist: John McCrea

Garth Ennis’ most underappreciated creation, this sunglasses-wearing assassin (whose Catholic upbringing only lets him take out “bad” people) and the regulars at Noonan’s Sleazy Bar are the motliest crew in comics, prone to mocking superheroes — Batman finds himself on the receiving end of some undigested Indian food, Green Lantern gets stuck with a bar tab and Lobo…you don’t want to know. The crew takes out a bizarre litany of terrifying targets, including zombie dolphins and a T-Rex, while trading stories over endless games of poker. You wouldn’t want to mess with Tommy Monaghan … but you probably wouldn’t mind having a beer with him, either. — Zack Smith

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1minaharkerfinal.jpg 91. Mina Harker
First Appearance: The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen #1
Best Writer: Alan Moore 
Best Artist: Kevin O’Neill

I’m sure you’ve noticed, but mainstream comics tend to have a gender-equality issue. The Wonder Womans and Sue Storms of the world are nice, of course, but comics could definitely use more gals like Mina Harker. A former prisoner of stifling Victorian patriarchy, Harker’s experiences with Dracula led to her becoming the leader of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Alan Moore’s Avengers-like super group of famed literary characters. Fiercely independent and unafraid to explore her sexuality, Mina is the kind of person who can verbally dress down her egotistical male counterparts while simultaneously one-upping them in sheer badassery. — Mark Rozeman

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1thewillalonefinal.png 90. The Will
First Appearance: Saga #1
Best Writer: Brian K. Vaughan
Best Artist: Fiona Staples 

We aren’t swooning over The Will for his bad-boy mystique and roguish charm — handsome, brooding tough guys are a dime a dozen in comics. What sets The Will apart is the complexity of his characterization. He assassinates people for a living, yet rescues a child from sex slavery. He’s a human with the chiseled jaw of a greek god, but he’s in love with a monstrous arachnid man-eater. We root for The Will, even as he hunts Saga’s protagonists, because he challenges us to reject normalcy and embrace the unconventional. — Frannie Jackson

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1abesapienfinal.jpg 89. Abe Sapien
First Appearance: Hellboy: Seed of Evil
Best Writer & Artist:   Mike Mignola  

No one could have expected the twisted, elaborate backstory of the genteel merman hanging out with Hellboy and a crew of government officials way back in “Seed of Destruction.” Alas, Abe Sapien turns out to be a former Victorian cultist whose marine-biology friends preserved his body after he merged with a sea deity. More than the religious and mythological undertones of Hellboy, Abe harkens back to the gothic and fantastic remnants of 19th century esoterica that are largely ignored today, save for the occasional H.P. Lovecraft shout out. This agonizing narrative keeps getting weirder and darker, and as much as we’d all love to see Abe get a happy ending, the rabbit hole he’s currently falling down is endlessly fascinating. — Sean Edgar

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1etriganthedemonfinal.jpg 88. Etrigan the Demon
First Appearance: The Demon #1
Best Writer: Garth Ennis
Best Artist: Jack Kirby

Etrigan is a demon of wit and wonder
Who, in a moment, can tear you asunder
Always forced to respond in rhyme and wit
Overwhelmed by his power, opponents always forfeit
Regardless of his constant sing-song tone,
His presence leaves hero or villain chilled to the bone
That’s what’s impressive — this demon’s dichotomy
Whose prose most likely makes writers want a lobotomy
But every time he’s on panel, he makes you grin
Because he’s the demon, Etrigan.
Darren Orf

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1apocalypsefinal.jpg 87. Apocalypse
First Appearance: X-Factor #5
Best Writer: Mark Waid, Jeph Loeb
Best Artist: Walt Simonson

The best, or at least the most memorable, moments in comics are the big reveals, and these moments have a few tell-tale signs. When a page ends with a foreboding passage followed by an ellipsis, a scheming villain or a shocking death usually follows. Among these moments, only a few baddies exist who can elicit an audible response that’s some variation of “oh shit.” Apocalypse is definitely one of them. When this dude is around, trouble is brewing. Remember when he conquered the ENTIRE MARVEL UNIVERSE (it may have been retconned into Earth-295, but still).

Many find Apocalypse’s moniker a little heavy-handed with its biblical connotations, but it’s not an overstatement when the guy lives up to the name. Easily the most powerful foe in the mutant universe (the Phoenix is a cosmic being, so don’t go there), he also comes with his own group of minions, known as the Four Horsemen. Though he was supposedly destroyed, Apocalypse’s reign of terror has left mental and physical scars across Earth-616, cementing the ancient mutant’s name through his catastrophic wake. — Darren Orf

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1thegoonfinal.jpg 86. The Goon
First Appearance: Dreamwalker #0
Best Writer & Artist: Eric Powell

The Goon is the quintessential strongman and the most memorable character from the mind of writer/artist Eric Powell. A vehicle for Powell’s own ruminations on social issues, the comic industry or funny shit in general, The Goon often moves beyond slapstick into much more subversive territory. He’s quick to throw a punch and mumble a witty retort to his pint-sized companion, Franky, and he’s known broadly as the neighborhood rough houser and excessive drinker. Although he’s all of these things, many of The Goon’s stories, especially the heart-wrenching Chinatown tale, reveal a deeper side to the mountain of malice and muscle. The Goon mirrors his namesake: dark, cynical, and unwilling to pull punches. It’s a comic and a character that can make you laugh and think simultaneously — a combination that’s rare in any medium. — Darren Orf

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1agent355final.png 85. Agent 355
First Appearance: Y: The Last Man #5
Best Writer: Brian K. Vaughan
Best Artist: Pia Guerra

In a world devoid of men, Agent 355 manages to stand out amongst throngs of women. A confident bodyguard, she devotes herself to protecting the last man on earth — even at the expense of her own happiness. Whether she’s kicking a ninja’s ass or knitting in her pajamas, Agent 355 earns our respect and admiration as she represses her own internal desires. — Frannie Jackson

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1buddybradleyfinal.jpg 84. Buddy Bradley
First Appearance: Comical Funnies
Best Writer & Artist: Peter Bagge

Generation X’ers might’ve known when they were being pandered to, but they weren’t always good at knowing when they were being made fun of (or else they just liked laughing at themselves). Peter Bagge’s semi-autobiographical Buddy Bradley isn’t a character to look up to or emulate — he’s a petty, cynical, hate-filled loser who’s too self-absorbed to have any true friends. For some, though, Bagge’s early ‘90s hipster caricature was the closest comics got to depicting the world Gen X’ers knew, or at least the world they thought would make them look cool if they acted like they knew it. Through Buddy, Bagge bitingly dredged up the paranoia at the core of every ‘90s alt doofus. — Garrett Martin

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1dashfinal.jpg 83. Dashiell “Dash” Bad Horse
First Appearance: Scalped #1
Best Writer: Jason Aaron
Best Artist: R.M. Guera

There are antiheroes and then there’s Dash, the “hero” of Jason Aaron’s Indian reservation-set noir. A seemingly ruthless “borderline sociopath” with a shaved head and a thirst for nunchucks-induced violence, Dash spends a good portion of the comic torn between his FBI supervisors and the reservation’s local crime boss. Much like he does with the series as a whole, however, Aaron soon peels away the layers to reveal something far more complex, eventually using Dash’s experiences to broach broader issues regarding the plight of modern day Native Americans and the cyclical entropy of reservation life. By the end of the series, you may not completely align yourself with Dash, but damn if you don’t understand where he’s coming from. — Mark Rozeman

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1orionfinal.jpg 82. Orion
First Appearance: New Gods #1
Best Writer & Artist: Jack Kirby

Jack Kirby took the nature vs. nurture argument to new heights with his New Gods epic, a grand mythology that repurposed Abrahamic plot beats into a Technicolor space opera. Almost any one of the gods could slide into this list; the Freon degree of cool surrounding Mr. Miracle, Big Bartha and the sinister Apokolips crew is undeniable. That said, Orion, son of ubervillain Darkseid traded to heavenly New Genesis as an infant, takes special notice. Orion overcame his diabolical lineage to soar around on an astro-harness and challenge his birth father for the planetary equivalent of hell. Reread that last sentence and thank the gods, new or otherwise, for Jack Kirby. — Sean Edgar

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1ironfistfinal.jpg 81. Iron Fist
First Appearance: Marvel Premier #15
Best Writer: Matt Fraction 
Best Artist: David Aja

As Matt Fraction has stated on multiple occasions, the “kung-fu billionaire” concept isn’t exactly a hard pitch. In addition, Iron Fist wielder Danny Rand comes with an elaborate backstory involving mystical cities, carnivorous business dealings and lots of punching. It’s ‘70s Wuxia grindhouse elation, with compelling racial commentary informed by Rand’s Heroes For Hire relationship with Luke Cage and the obvious Asian Cinema trimmings. The character’s aughties resurrection by Matt Fraction combined with Kaare Andrews’ Iron Fist: The Living Weapon relaunch have ensured that Iron Fist truly is immortal. — Sean Edgar

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1matchstickfinal.jpg 80. Kevin Matchstick
First Appearance: Mage: The Hero Discovered #1
Best Writer & Artist: Matt Wagner

Kevin Matchstick isn’t so much an actor as a guide, escorting the reader into writer/artist Matt Wagner’s examination of modern mythology in Mage: The Hero Discovered and Mage: The Hero Defined. The beauty of Matchstick is that he takes Joseph Campbell-heavy themes and makes them undeniably interesting and grounded. Aided by Wagner’s gorgeous line work (the artist and character bear more than a few visual similarities), Matchstick fights dragons and tumbles down the monomyth with reluctance and honesty, wielding Excaliber incarnated in a baseball bat. If Matchstick were the default teacher of other pop art academia, there would never be another empty classroom. — Sean Edgar

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1archieandrewsfinal.jpg 79. Archie Andrews
First Appearance: Pep Comics #22
Best Writer & Artist: Bob Montana

As a character, Archie’s not that interesting. He’s a typical mid-century American (white, middle-class) teen: a boringly pleasant, hetero horn-dog with the sort of “problems” (car, girl, money) that could only be considered problems by the middle-class. As the centerpiece for one of comics’ largest and longest-running cast of characters, though, Archie is a perfectly calibrated place-holder — a sounding board for his diverse friends and the idiosyncratic faculty of Riverdale High. And if Archie seems a little stereotypical, that’s because (along with Mickey Rooney’s Andy Hardy) his character basically created the template for the American teenager. — Garrett Martin

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1drmanhattanrealfinal.jpg 78. Dr. Manhattan
First Appearance: Watchmen #1
Best Writer: Alan Moore 
Best Artist: Dave Gibbons

It’s hard to think of a more powerful hero than Watchmen’s Dr. Manhattan, born after physicist Jon Osterman was trapped in an intrinsic field subtractor in the ‘50s. When his body reassembled atom-by-atom, a deity formed — one so powerful that Nixon himself called upon the hero to intervene when Vietnam got rough. Dr. Manhattan’s detachment from humanity is almost understandable; the post-human sports telekinesis, matter control and clairvoyance. What earthly pleasures could keep a god happy? — Tyler Kane

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1michonnefinal.jpg 77. Michonne
First Appearance: The Walking Dead #19
Best Writer: Robert Kirkman 
Best Artist: Charlie Adlard

The laconic ronin of the zombie apocalypse and an integral member of Rick Grimes’ band of survivors, Michonne quickly became a fan favorite for her katana skills and penchant for dragging around leashed, armless walkers. But what really sets her apart is her capacity for brutality — and not just in killing zombies. She reveals what even good people are capable of when pushed to the breaking point. After bearing the brunt of The Governor’s sadism, her revenge involves a massive amount of maiming and mutilation (not to mention her cringe-inducing use of a spoon). That said, the brief moments of humanity that shine through Michonne define the grey morality that saturates The Walking Dead universe. — Robert Tutton

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1galactusfinal.jpg 76. Galactus
First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #48
Best Writer: Stan Lee 
Best Artist: Jack Kirby

Please, for god’s sake, let’s forget the “Galactus” in the execrable Fantastic Four: The Rise of the Silver Surfer. (In fact, forget everything about that movie, if you can.) While superheroes have defused many Earth-destroying threats over the decades, Galactus represented perhaps the most implacable. His original arc in the pages of the The Fantastic Four (#48-50) is a classic, and his level of menace, metaphysical. Somehow, in a world filled with power-hungry tyrants, an impersonal destroyer of worlds — dude’s gotta eat — terrifies on a whole different level. — Michael Burgin

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1invinciblefinal.jpg 75. Invincible
First Appearance: Tech Jacket #1
Best Writer: Robert Kirkman 
Best Artist: Ryan Ottley

At his core, Robert Kirkman’s young hero represents an intriguing mix of Peter Parker-meets-Kal-el. The storylines here are seldom predictable, mixing a vast framework of beats established by Marvel and DC over decades in new and astonishing ways. So much happens in the course of any single Invincible arc (betrayals! new brothers! death! more death!) that this comic book bildungsroman avoids anything remotely resembling a status quo, relying on its winsome lead to be the glue behind an aggressively-shifting narrative. But when your character is as pure and likable as Grayson, there isn’t much that could happen to keep you from devouring next month’s chapter to discover how everyone’s favorite hero-in-training will greet his next earth-shaking conflict.

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1banefinal.jpg 74. Bane
First Appearance: Batman: Vengeance of Bane #1
Best Writer: Chuck Dixon
Best Artist: Brian Bolland

Like The Joker, the scariest thing about Bane is his motives (or lack thereof). The beastly man infamously put Batman out of commission in the Knightfall comics, forcing a broken Bruce Wayne to let Jean-Paul Valley take over the Dark Knight mantle. Bane’s a terrifying foe, born in darkness and raised to thrive on terror—not endure it. As badly as he was botched in Batman and Robin, his first on-screen appearance, Tom Hardy later knocked the role out of the park in The Dark Knight Rises. — Tyler Kane

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1groofinal.jpg 73. Groo the Wanderer
First Appearance: Destroyer Duck #1
Best Writer & Artist: Sergio Aragonés

Mad Magazine vet Sergio Aragones obliterated the swords and sandals archetype with Groo, a bumbling barbarian who can shake a mean saber but isn’t good at much else. Groo greets massive battles with nothing to rely on except a steady stream of testosterone and his blades. He extends the eccentric idiocy of male comic protagonists not just to Medieval brawlers, but to all violence-prone heroes in the medium. Though he was created in the ‘70s, much of Groo’s chaotic, exaggerated wit seeded a future where characters like The Tick could continue to skew the tights and muscles crowd. — Sean Edgar

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1emmafrostfinal.jpg 72. Emma Frost
First Appearance: Uncanny X-Men #129
Best Writer: Joss Whedon 
Best Artist: John Byrne

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1luciferfinal.jpg 71. Lucifer
First Appearance: The Sandman #4
Best Writer: Mike Carey
Best Artist: Peter Gross

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1venomfinal.jpg 70. Venom
First Appearance: The Amazing Spider-Man #252
Best Writer: David Michelinie
Best Artist: Todd McFarlane

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1silversurfermain.jpg 69. Silver Surfer
First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #48
Best Writer: Stan Lee 
Best Artist: Moebius

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1batwomanfinal.jpg 68. Batwoman
First Appearance: Detective Comics #233
Best Writer: Greg Rucka
Best Artist: J.H. Williams III

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1captainhaddockfinal.jpg 67. Captain Haddock
First Appearance: Tintin: The Crab with the Golden Claws
Best Writer & Artist: Hergé

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1kravenfinal.jpg 66. Kraven the Hunter
First Appearance: The Amazing Spider-Man #15
Best Writer: J.M. DeMatteis
Best Artist: Mike Zeck

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1starmanfinal.jpg 65. Jack Knight
First Appearance: Zero Hour #1
Best Writer: James Robinson
Best Artist: Tony Harris

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1maryjanefinal.jpg 64. Mary Jane Watson
First Appearance: The Amazine Spider-Man #25
Best Writer: Sean McKeever
Best Artist: John Romita, Sr.

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1marvrealfinal.jpg 63. Marv
First Appearance: Sin City: The Hard Goodbye
Best Writer &Artist:   Frank Miller  

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1jugheadfinal.jpg 62. Jughead Jones
First Appearance: Pep Comics #1
Best Writer & Artist: Bob Montana

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1deadpoolfinal.jpg 61. Deadpool
First Appearance: New Mutants #98
Best Writer: Fabian Nicieza/Joe Kelly
Best Artist: Ed McGuinness

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1ultronfinal.jpg 60. Ultron
First Appearance: Avengers #54
Best Writer: Roy Thomas
Best Artist: George Perez

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1rickgrimesfinal.jpg 59. Rick Grimes
First Appearance: The Walking Dead #1
Best Writer: Robert Kirkman 
Best Artist: Charlie Adlard

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1thanosfinal.jpg 58. Thanos
First Appearance: Iron Man #55
Best Writer & Artist: Jim Starlin

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1rorschachfinal.jpg 57. Rorschach
First Appearance: Watchmen #1
Best Writer: Alan Moore 
Best Artist: Dave Gibbons

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1hawkeyefinal.jpg 56. Hawkeye
First Appearance: Tales of Suspense #57
Best Writer: Matt Fraction 
Best Artist: David Aja

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1asterixfinal.png 55. Asterix
First Appearance: Pilote #1
Best Writer: René Goscinny
Best Artist: Albert Uderzo

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1alanafinal.jpg 54. Alana
First Appearance: Saga #1
Best Writer: Brian K. Vaughan
Best Artist: Fiona Staples 

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1nickfuryfinal.png 53. Nick Fury
First Appearance: Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos #1
Best Writer: Jonathan Hickman
Best Artist: Jim Steranko

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1grendelfinal.jpg 52. Grendel (Hunter Rose)
First Appearance: Comico Primer #2
Best Writer & Artist: Matt Wagner

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1arrowfinal.jpg 51. Green Arrow
First Appearance: More Fun Comics #73
Best Writer: Andy Diggle
Best Artist: Jock

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1miraclemanfinal.jpg 50. Miracleman/Marvelman
First Appearance: Marvelman Annual 1954
Best Writer: Alan Moore 
Best Artist: Alan Davis

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1beastfinal.jpg 49. Beast
First Appearance: X-Men #1
Best Writer: Jason Aaron
Best Artist: Jim Lee

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1jessicajonesfinal.jpg 48. Jessica Jones
First Appearance: Alias #1
Best Writer: Brian Michael Bendis
Best Artist: Michael Gaydos

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1snowwhitefinal.jpg 47. Snow White
First Appearance: Fables #1
Best Writer: Bill Willingham
Best Artist: Mark Buckingham

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1mrfantasticfinal.png 46. Mr. Fantastic
First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #1
Best Writer: Jonathan Hickman
Best Artist: Jack Kirby

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1katchoofinal.jpg 45. Katina “Katchoo” Choovanski
First Appearance: Strangers in Paradise #1
Best Writer & Artist: Terry Moore

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1granmabenfinal.jpg 44. Gran’ma Ben
First Appearance: Thorn: Tales from the Lantern #1
Best Writer & Artist: Jeff Smith

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1animalmanfinal.jpg 43. Animal Man
First Appearance: Strange Adventures #180
Best Writer:   Grant Morrison  
Best Artist: Chas Truog

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1lukecagefinal.png 42. Luke Cage
First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #1
Best Writer: Brian Michael Bendis
Best Artist: Leinil Francis Yu

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1habibifinal.jpg 41. Dodola
First Appearance: Habibi
Best Writer & Artist: Craig Thompson

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1lexluthorfinal.jpg 40. Lex Luthor
First Appearance: Action Comics #23
Best Writer: Brian Azzarello
Best Artist: Frank Quitely

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39. V
First Appearance: V for Vendetta #1
Best Writer: Alan Moore 
Best Artist: David Lloyd

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1drstrangefinal.jpg 38. Doctor Strange
First Appearance: Strange Tales #110
Best Writer: Steve Englehart
Best Artist: Steve Ditko

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1lonewolfcubfinal.jpg 37. Lone Wolf and Cub
First Appearance: Lone Wolf & Cub: The Assassin’s Road
Best Writer: Kazuo Koike
Best Artist: Goseki Kojima

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1greengoblinfinal.png 36. Green Goblin
First Appearance: The Amazing Spider-Man #14
Best Writer: Gerry Conway
Best Artist: John Romita, Sr.

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1enidcoleslawfinal.jpg 35. Enid Coleslaw
First Appearance: Ghost World
Best Writer & Artist: Daniel Clowes

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1scottpilgrimfinal.png 34. Scott Pilgrim
First Appearance: Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life
Best Writer & Artist: Bryan Lee O’Malley

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1fonebonefinal.jpg 33. Fone Bone
First Appearance: Thorn: Tales from the Lantern #1
Best Writer & Artist: Jeff Smith

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1vladekfinal.jpg 32. Vladek
First Appearance: Maus I: A Survivor’s Tale: My Father Bleeds History
Best Writer & Artist: Art Spiegelman

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1robinfinal.png 31. Robin (Dick Grayson)
First Appearance: Detective Comics #38
Best Writer: Jim Starlin
Best Artist: George Perez

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1stormdavefinal.png 30. Storm
First Appearance: Giant-Size X-Men #1
Best Writer: Chris Claremont
Best Artist: Dave Cockrum

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1hulkfinal.jpg 29. Hulk
First Appearance: Incredible Hulk #1
Best Writer: Peter David
Best Artist: John Romita, Jr.

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1usagifinal.png 28. Miyamoto Usagi
First Appearance: Albedo Anthropomorphics #2
Best Writer & Artist: Stan Sakai

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1swampthingfinal.jpg 27. Swamp Thing
First Appearance: House of Secrets #92
Best Writer: Alan Moore 
Best Artist: Stephen Bissette

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1thorfinal.jpg 26. Thor
First Appearance: Journey into Mystery #83
Best Writer & Artist: Walt Simonson

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1jeangreyfinal.jpg 25. Jean Grey
First Appearance: X-Men #1
Best Writer: Chris Claremont
Best Artist: John Byrne

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1judgedreddfinal.jpg 24. Judge Dredd
First Appearance: 2000 AD #2
Best Writer: John Wagner
Best Artist: Carlos Ezquerra

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1wallyflashfinal.jpg 23. The Flash (Wally West)
First Appearance: The Flash #110
Best Writer: Geoff Johns
Best Artist: Scott Kolins

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1spiderjerusalemfinal.jpg 22. Spider Jerusalem
First Appearance: Transmetropolitan #1
Best Writer: Warren Ellis
Best Artist: Darick Robertson

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1ironmanfinal.jpg 21. Iron Man
First Appearance: Tales of Suspense #39
Best Writer: David Michelinie
Best Artist: Bob Layton

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1hellboyfinal.jpg 20. Hellboy
First Appearance: Dime Press #4
Best Writer & Artist: Mike Mignola 

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1jessecusterfinal.jpg 19. Jesse Custer
First Appearance: Preacher #1
Best Writer: Garth Ennis
Best Artist: Steve Dillon

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1thingfinal.png 18. The Thing
First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #1
Best Writer: Stan Lee 
Best Artist: Jack Kirby

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1greenlanternfinal.jpg 17. Green Lantern (Hal Jordan)
First Appearance: DC Showcase #22
Best Writer: Geoff Johns
Best Artist: Neal Adams

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1doctordoomfinal.jpg 16. Doctor Doom
First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #5
Best Writer: Stan Lee 
Best Artist: Jack Kirby

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1scroogemcduckfinal.png 15. Scrooge McDuck
First Appearance: Dell Four Color Comics #178
Best Writer & Artist: Carl Barks

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1profxfinal.jpg 14. Professor X
First Appearance: X-Men #1
Best Writer: Chris Claremont
Best Artist: Frank Quitely

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1constantinefinal.jpg 13. John Constantine
First Appearance: The Saga of the Swamp Thing #37
Best Writer: Garth Ennis
Best Artist: Steve Dillon

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1magnetofinal.png 12. Magneto
First Appearance: X-Men #1
Best Writer: Chris Claremont
Best Artist: John Byrne

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1hopeyfinal.png 11. Esperanza Leticia “Hopey” Glass
First Appearance: Love and Rockets #1
Best Writer & Artist: Jaime Hernandez

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1maggiefinal.png 10. Margarita Luisa “Maggie” Chascarrillo
First Appearance: Love and Rockets #1
Best Writer & Artist: Jaime Hernandez

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1wolverinefinal.jpg 9. Wolverine
First Appearance: Incredible Hulk #180
Best Writer: Chris Claremont
Best Artist: Joe Madureira

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1morpheusfinal.jpg 8. Morpheus
First Appearance: The Sandman #1
Best Writer: Neil Gaiman 
Best Artist: Dave McKean

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1captainamericafinal.jpg 7. Captain America
First Appearance: Captain America Comics #1
Best Writer: Ed Brubaker
Best Artist: Jack Kirby

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1wonderwomanfinal.png 6. Wonder Woman
First Appearance: All Star Comics #8
Best Writer: Brian Azzarello
Best Artist: George Perez

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1daredevilfinal.png 5. Daredevil
First Appearance: Daredevil #1
Best Writer: Frank Miller 
Best Artist: Bill Sienkiewicz

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1jokerfinal.jpg 4. The Joker
First Appearance: Batman #1
Best Writer: Alan Moore 
Best Artist: Brian Bolland

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1supermanfinal.png 3. Superman
First Appearance: Action Comics #1
Best Writer: Grant Morrison 
Best Artist: Curt Swan

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SMan.jpg 2. Spider-Man
First Appearance: Amazing Fantasy #15
Best Writer: Stan Lee 
Best Artist: Steve Ditko

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1batmanfinal.jpg 1. Batman
First Appearance: Detective Comics #27
Best Writer: Frank Miller 
Best Artist: Neal Adams

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