10 New Albums to Listen to Today

Featuring Danger Mouse & Black Thought, Megan Thee Stallion, Tony Molina and more

Music Lists New Albums
Share Tweet Submit Pin
10 New Albums to Listen to Today

Fridays are a special day for Paste, thanks to the incredible music that we get to share with you. Like clockwork, we compile the week’s best, most exciting releases to accompany each batch of songs. Find something new to take into the weekend with you among these must-hear albums.

Boris: Heavy Rocks

Veteran Tokyo-based trio Boris stay true to their tendency to title albums literally on their latest—this is, after all, the band who gave us Amplifier Worship (1998) and New Album (2011), not to mention two previous records also called Heavy Rocks (2002, 2011). As evidenced both on last year’s W and throughout the band’s decades-long career, though, Boris’ experimental rock defies expectations as readily as it sets them, with a passion for volume and the irrepressible force of their creativity as the only constants. Their latest—and perhaps greatest—Heavy Rocks installment is no exception, showcasing the band’s voracious appetite for rock of the noise, glam, punk and sludge varieties, to name only a few. It’s another triumph for a band who live to bring the noise. —Scott Russell

Listen here

Claude: a lot’s gotta change

Claudia Ferme, the pilot of the dream-pop project Claude, speaks candidly when locating her early-to-mid 20s as “formative, sometimes confusing years.” As arbitrary as the entrance to adulthood can be, the years Claude calls forth often serve as a foundation-constructing period whose aftereffects reverberate throughout one’s entire adult life, seemingly without fail. In the face of such turbulence, Claude responds with her first LP and American Dreams Records debut, a lot’s gonna change, a collection of wise, meticulous art pop that depicts 20-something existentialism with gravitas but without melodrama. The end result is sympathetic and riveting, on top of simply being a promising debut for the pop upstart. —Devon Chodzin

Listen here

Danger Mouse & Black Thought: Cheat Codes

Danger Mouse is a chameleon, assuming whatever identity and style are needed to allow his collaborators to shine. Philadelphia emcee Black Thought was the perfect choice. Together, the two created Cheat Codes, marrying sprawling jazz soundscapes with stream-of-consciousness raps. Whether working in seminal jazz-rap outfit The Roots or hopping on a project with Danger Mouse, Black Thought operates all the same, with a lyrical tunnel vision that challenges listeners to follow a winding trail to enlightenment. Danger Mouse adds a distinct analog-like feel, blurring the line between artificial and real as he layers drums, guitars and warm static into a playground for Black Thought to spit on. The sky is the limit on Cheat Codes, and the collaborators have only scratched the surface of their potential. —Jade Gomez

Listen here

Hudson Mohawke: Cry Sugar

Ross Birchard, better known as boundary-pusher Hudson Mohawke, has been introduced to the masses as the incredible producer behind some of rap’s biggest acts, ranging from Kanye West to Pusha T. As one-half of TNGHT alongside fellow electronic provocateur Lunice, Mohawke also ventured deeper into the trap world to expand the understanding of club and dance music. Point is, the versatile producer’s options are endless, and his solo albums are a playground to innovate further. Cry Sugar, his first solo album since 2015, does not hold back on the Scottish producer’s maximalist leanings. His dizzying blend of passionate soul samples, ear-shattering noise, disjointed vocals and metallic clangs has all of the flair with none of the ego. Mohawke allows the music to speak for itself, reaching the highest of highs to provide a kinesthetic experience through the catharsis of electronic music. —Jade Gomez

Listen here

Kiwi Jr.: Chopper

Toronto band Kiwi Jr.’s 2021 album Cooler Returns didn’t really have a heavy load in terms of justifying the jangle-pop-meets-‘90s Gen X indie rock modus operandi of their maiden voyage, Football Money. In many ways, it did that album one better with more urgent arrangements and the confident swagger of a caged velociraptor finding a weak spot in the electric fence at Jurassic Park. With Chopper, the band doesn’t exactly go polka, so to speak, though there is a noticeable progression in their sound that points towards subtle and tasteful refinement. With production from Wolf Parade and Handsome Furs mastermind—and current Arcade Fire member—Dan Boeckner, Chopper sees the clanking of lead singer and songwriter Jeremy Gaudet’s 12-string takes a backseat to thick and tuneful synth lines. The album is full of plastic pop like the single “Night Vision” that evokes the claustrophobic and extraterrestrial new wave sounds of The Cars to great effect. It’s a sound that suits the band wonderfully as they choose to heighten hooks that were already wildly abundant in their songs, rather than strive for grandiosity. —Pat King

Listen here

Megan Thee Stallion: Traumazine

Megan Thee Stallion has been through unspeakable trauma, much of which she addressed in her 2020 debut studio album Good News. The Houston rapper has tried to clear up the misinformation surrounding her shooting that occurred only a few months prior to the album’s release. In 2022, she understands she will never be able to convince people who refuse to believe her, and she channels it all into Traumazine. Mixtape Megan is back, this time with glossy major label production to elevate the whip-smart lyricism that can go toe-to-toe with almost any seasoned vet. Much like electrifying Good News opener which is directed at her alleged shooter Tory Lanez, Traumazine kicks off with “NDA,” a tense, no-bullshit warning to all the fakes and doubters. From then on, Megan indulges in raunchy sex and neverending boasts. Over dark trap beats and woozy Southern rap throwbacks, the rapper reminds people why she’s still on top and has no intention of coming down any time soon. —Jade Gomez

Listen here

OSEES: A Foul Form

There are very few musicians who have redefined the parameters of what it means to be punk quite like John Dwyer of the long-running and shapeshifting San Francisco band OSEES. The prolific mastermind of the group has taken the band from its early punked-up garage-psych beginnings to create kaiju-sized prog-metal epics and mind-altering krautrock soundscapes, breaking down any limitations on what they could strive for on record. On the new record, A Foul Form, the band rips through 10 no-bullshit, lo-fi punk ragers in just 22 minutes. Each track pares things down to pay homage to hardcore’s beautiful simplicity while working in menacing, bad-trip electronics to shake off any illusion of this record being a simple genre exercise. The album is a joyous, lightning-crack celebration of the crusty kids out there creating classics without a care in the world about whether their records adhered to any rules of fidelity. —Pat King

Listen here

Panda Bear & Sonic Boom: Reset

Reset, the latest of Noah Lennox’s releases as Panda Bear, arguably draws from his strengths as a musician perpetually unstuck in time more than any of his earlier records. Curiously enough, the person bringing this element to the forefront is Spacemen 3’s Sonic Boom (aka Pete Kember), previously Lennox’s producer on Tomboy and Panda Bear Meets the Grim Reaper, taking on an equal role in performance this time around. Kember not only joins Lennox in his usual array of harmonizing vocals and synthesizers, but also offered the germ of Reset’s context—expanding on intros from records of pop’s earliest years as the primary foundation for multiple tracks. The effect is infectiously immediate from the album’s opening seconds. Even before either Lennox or Kember can be felt on the record, the triumphant acoustic guitar chords of Eddie Cochran’s “Three Steps to Heaven” burst forth. Lennox then emerges with a gleefully soaring vocal part, and the track—the magnificent tone-setter “Gettin’ to the Point”—fully becomes his and Kember’s. Much of the joy in Reset comes in instances like these, where Lennox and Kember wholeheartedly embrace the sounds of the past with a distinctly contemporary approach. —Natalie Marlin

Listen here

Sylvan Esso: No Rules Sandy

Four albums and nearly a decade into their career, North Carolina electronic duo Sylvan Esso have bottled lightning. Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn surprised their Newport Folk Festival audience with a full performance of No Rules Sandy in late July, only making an official announcement afterward, and that exciting spontaneity defines not only its rollout, but also the album itself. Meath and Sanborn created the bulk of the LP in just three weeks, their fastest and most instinctive recording process to date, and enlisted contributions from drummer TJ Maiani, string arrangements by Gabriel Kahane and saxophone from Sam Gendel. The result is Sylvan Esso’s most thrillingly unpredictable outing yet, 16 tracks—including intimate, diary-like recordings as connective tissue—that feel fresh and vital even at their most familiar. Standout “Echo Party,” for instance, stays true to the duo’s signature kinetic dance-pop energy, but with enough sonic idiosyncrasy and nuance to render a bold new iteration of their sound. No Rules Sandy is a risk that pays off, and a testament to the power of self-belief. Meath and Sanborn’s trust in each other is, and has always been, well-placed. —Scott Russell

Listen here

Tony Molina: In The Fade

Amid acclaim for his restrained 2018 album Kill The Lights, one particular notion stuck in Tony Molina’s craw. “I kept hearing: ‘Oh, he’s maturing, he’s getting into other shit, writing more mature stuff,” he recalls in press materials. “I thought, ‘Man, that’s kinda lame, no I’m not … ’” As if to prove that his older sounds weren’t “immature,” and that he owns every style he’s explored across his singular career, the micro-pop iconoclast made In The Fade. His longest record yet at 18 minutes, it encompasses the power-pop fuzz of Dissed and Dismissed and the swaggering guitar-monies of Ovens, as well as the ‘60s acoustic-folk flourishes of Confront the Truth and Kill the Lights, all tied together with the unerring ear for melody and wry humor that define Molina’s solo output. Simply put, it’s an album that only Tony Molina could make, made on no one’s terms but his. —Scott Russell

Listen here

And don’t forget to check out … Alicia Keys: KEYS II, Amythyst Kiah: Pensive Pop EP, Danny Elfman: Bigger. Messier., Doll Spirit Vessel: What Stays, Erasure: Day-Glo (Based on a True Story), Faye: You’re Better, The Game: Drillmatic, Goo Goo Dolls: Chaos in Bloom, Hollywood Undead: Hotel Kalifornia, Kamikaze Palm Tree: Mint Chip, Lauren Balthrop: Things Will Be Different, Pale Waves: Unwanted, Rat Tally: In My Car