New Movies on Hulu

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New Movies on Hulu

Hulu has been slower than some of its competitors getting in the original movie game, focusing more on building its library of films and developing original series. But it’s done a better job of securing rights to new movies that have just finished their theatrical runs. We’ll keep a running tab on the newest Hulu movies, including both originals and first-streaming films.

Below are 10 newly added films from the streaming service. We’ll update the list as Hulu continues to produce new features and acquire the rights to recent films.


1. The Year of the Everlasting Storm

everlasting-storm.jpg Hulu Release Date: Jan 3, 2022 (initially released Sept. 3, 2021)
Director: Jafar Panahi, Malik Vitthal, Laura Poitras, Dominga Sotomayor, David Lowery, Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Genre: Documentary, Drama
Rating: TV-MA
Runtime: 115 minutes

Watch on Hulu

This six-part anthology movie seeks to capture life during lockdown with both documentary and fictional stories from six different directors, including David Lowery and Apichatpong Weerasethakul. The stories range from family drama to the more surreal (Weerasethakul’s segment just shows an empty bed in an insect-filled room). The film debuted at Cannes before a limited release in the U.S. back in September.


2. Pig

pig-poster.jpg Hulu Release Date: Jan 1, 2022 (initially released July 16, 2021)
Director: Michael Sarnoski
Stars: Nicolas Cage, Alex Wolff, Adam Arkin
Genre: Drama
Rating: R
Runtime: 92 minutes
Paste Review Score: 8.6

Watch on Hulu

In the forest outside Portland, a man’s pig is stolen. Rob (Nicolas Cage) is a witchy truffle forager that we learn used to be a chef—a Michelin-starred Baba Yaga, a gastronomical Radagast—who sells his pig’s findings to sustain his isolated life. What follows is not a revenge thriller. This is not a porcine Taken. Pig, the ambitious debut of writer/director Michael Sarnoski, is a blindsiding and measured treatise on the masculine response to loss. Featuring Nicolas Cage in one of his most successful recent permutations, evolving Mandy’s silent force of nature to an extinct volcano of scabbed-over pain, Pig unearths broad themes by thoroughly sniffing out the details of its microcosm. The other component making up this Pacific NW terrarium, aside from Rob and the golden-furred Brandy’s endearingly shorthanded connection, is the guy Rob sells his truffles to, Amir. Alex Wolff’s tiny Succession-esque business jerk is a bundle of jagged inadequacies, and only Rob’s calloused wisdom can handle such prickliness. They’re exceptional foils for one another, classic tonal opposites that share plenty under the surface of age. Together, the pair search for the pignapping victim, which inevitably leads them out of the forest and back into the city. There they collide with the seediest, John Wick’s Kitchen Confidential kind of industry underbelly you can imagine, in a series of standoffs, soliloquies and strange stares. It’s a bit heightened, but in a forgotten and built-over way that feels more secret than fantastic. The sparse and spacious writing allows its actors to fill in the gaps, particularly Cage. Where some of Cage’s most riveting experiments used to be based in manic deliveries and expressionistic faces, what seems to engage him now is the opposite: Silence, stillness, realist hurt and downcast eyes. You can hear Cage scraping the rust off Rob’s voice, grinding the interpersonal gears much like the dilapidated truck he tries (and fails) to take into town. Wolff, along with much of the rest of the cast, projects an intense desperation for validation—a palpable desire to win the rat race and be somebody. It’s clear that Rob was once a part of this world before his self-imposed exile, clear from knowing gazes and social cues as much as the scenarios that lead the pig-seekers through basements and kitchens. Part of Pig’s impactful, moving charm is its restraint. It’s a world only hinted at in 87 minutes, but with a satisfying emotional thoroughness. We watch this world turn only slightly, but the full dramatic arcs of lives are on display. A sad but not unkind movie, and certainly not a pessimistic one, Pig puts its faith in a discerning audience to look past its premise.—Jacob Oller


3. Dead Asleep

dead-asleep.jpg Hulu Release Date: Dec. 16, 2021
Director: Skye Borgman
Genre: Documentary
Rating: TV-MA
Runtime: 86 minutes
Paste Review Score: 5.5

Watch on Hulu

The unyielding, algorithm-fueled glut of true crime content gains yet another entry in the straight-to-streaming canon with Dead Asleep, the latest from documentarian Skye Borgman. Much like in her 2017 Netflix film Abducted in Plain Sight, the film’s goal is to be as shallowly entertaining and consumable as possible, even if that means trading documentary ethics for a slick, sensationalist slant. However, the film is not particularly egregious in its missteps, closely following a blueprint that has been regurgitated on a recent loop—a component much more damning of the entire true crime media obsession than one single film. Dead Asleep follows the case of Randy Herman Jr., who was arrested in 2017 after brutally stabbing his childhood friend and roommate, Brooke Preston, to death. Despite being covered in blood and possessing defensive wounds when police arrive on the scene, Herman claims to have no recollection of the incident—an assertion that causes him to plead not guilty by reason of insanity. While Herman’s cognitive functions appear to be completely rational in his on-screen interviews, his defense posits that the DSM-5 would categorize him as having sleep arousal disorder—and this unquellable corner of his psyche is actually what drove him to kill without motivation. Allegedly having suffered from chronic sleepwalking throughout his entire life, Herman believes he was experiencing a period of unconscious action when he murdered the 21-year-old. Given exclusive access to Herman (now 28 and serving a life sentence), his family, legal representation and journalists who locally reported on the West Palm Beach murder case, Borgman’s doc is nonetheless one-sided. Preston’s family declined involvement in the documentary and as such, Brooke is hardly a palpable presence in the narrative. Dead Asleep offers absolutely no resolution—it’s up to the viewer to discern whether or not they buy Herman’s story—an irresponsible way of framing the case, as it omits the perspective of Brooke’s family entirely (aside from one devastating yet voyeuristic clip that reveals her mother’s reaction to her murder). Without their presence, the film flimsily focuses on Herman’s sleepwalking defense, which is ultimately nothing more than a cheap gimmick Borgman has little intention of unraveling. Information is spouted straight from the case file, a banal approach that hardly interrogates the material circumstances and medical intricacies of sleepwalking. It becomes impossible to parse exactly what the documentary exists to prove, aside from the fact that true crime content always performs well—even among those who are explicitly asked not to engage with an unwanted, uncorroborated story. —Natalia Keogan


4. Cryptozoo

cryptozoo.jpg Hulu Release Date: Dec. 16, 2021 (initially released Aug. 20, 2021)
Director: Dash Shaw
Stars: Lake Bell, Michael Cera, Emily Davis
Genre: Animation, fantasy
Runtime: 90 minutes

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Dash Shaw’s vibrantly animated Cryptozoo explores the oft-fantasized premise of cryptids and humans coexisting, pulling more from Jurassic Park than typical mainstream animated counterparts like Zootopia. Interested in interrogating the exploitation of fantasy and imagination for human consumption, Shaw’s psychedelic, patently adult animated feature brings daydreams into the pointedly violent and bleak reality that its genre contemporaries are privy to ignore. The universe presented in cartoonist/writer/director Shaw’s film—animated in a style that feels like a graphic novel come to life—is our collective memory of the ’60s counterculture movement, but with one key reality-shattering amendment: Every fabled creature from human folklore walks among us, seldom seen but perpetually hunted due to their high demand on the black market. Ceasing the ill-treatment of these creatures is the life’s work of Lauren Gray (Lake Bell), who tracks down abused and injured cryptids and transports them to the Cryptozoo—a live-in amusement park in San Francisco where these beings are put on display or employed, depending on their proximity to human aptitude. While the fantastical idea of cryptids sharing the Earth with existing fauna tantalizes the imagination, the crux of Cryptozoo is bringing this charming premise into our existing hyper-capitalist society—showing just how easily our bloodthirsty system will snuff out the markedly different and extraordinary. Lauren is just one of the film’s many ’60s Bay Area countercultural caricatures—voiced by a litany of alt-comedians and indie movie actors such as Michael Cera, Jason Schwartzman and Zoe Kazan—alongside an idealistic hippie couple that, in one brutal early scene, learn a harsh lesson on imposing simplistic human attitudes on the complex natural world. The film’s critique of capitalism dovetails with its negative view of American countercultural movements, arguing that the commodification of these movements deters them from making any kind of change; the real-world parallels are evident. —Natalia Keogan


5. Materna

materna.jpg Hulu Release Date: Dec. 10, 2021 (initially released Aug. 10, 2021)
Director: David Gutnik
Stars: Kate Lyn Sheil, Sturgill Simpso, Lindsay Burdge, Jade Eshete, Assol Abdullina, Michael Chernus, Rory Culkin
Genre: Drama
Rating: R
Runtime: 106 minutes

Watch on Hulu

This film tells four stories of four New York women and their mothers, moving from the city’s subway, where Sturgill Simpson’s character is a mentally unstable and intimidating passenger on a train, to a funeral in Kyrgyzstan, where an emigrant returns home after the death of her father. David Gutnik’s feature debut won several prizes on the festival circuit before getting a limited release last August.


6. Swan Song

swan-song.jpg Hulu Release Date: Dec. 9, 2021 (initially released Aug. 6, 2021)
Director: Todd Stephens
Stars: Udo Kier, Jennifer Coolidge, Linda Evans, Michael Urie
Genre: Drama
Rating: R
Runtime: 106 minutes
Paste Review Score: 6.0

Watch on Hulu

After the tempered (though pleasurable) fantasy of Pat Pitsenberger’s (Udo Kier) final performance, to an empty throng on a spacious stage, is cut short, the retired hairdresser is sent back to his banal existence in a retirement home, the ordinariness of his life soundtracked by Judy Garland. For a film that lets its score (by Chris Stephens) and needledrops do a lot of heavy lifting, Swan Song’s use of Garland is one of its more apt and precise moments: Director Todd Stephens frames Kier in the reflection of an old, square and black TV screen, his image slightly distorted by the curvature of the glass. The audience applauds, and it’s nice to imagine it all being for Pat, who we don’t know well. It’s appropriate that Swan Song is concerned with memory and history. When offered the opportunity to style the body of a longtime client—Rita Parker Sloan (Linda Evans), with whom he had a falling out many years ago—for her funeral, Pat ambivalently launches himself on a journey to contemplate his place in people’s lives and others’ in his. He marches down the sun-beaten Ohio road in grey sweats, a long, thin, brown cigarette between his lips, and—on the way to transform another person and jolt them with life once more—transforms himself. Concerning itself with death and history, Swan Song asks for an assured hand, but gets an ambitious assistant’s—one whose scrutiny and interest in the assortment of ideas within the work dithers, but whose ideas are nonetheless present if left only simmering. There’s a glimmer of maturity not totally obfuscated by some of the film’s inelegance, as Pat considers how much about gayness and queerness has changed in the micro and macro on his journey into the past. It’s also just a pleasure to see Kier gussied up like Quentin Crisp. If only Swan Song felt the freedom to be as expressive, heightened and scorched in its unleashing of history as Judy did when singing her own back in 1961. —Kyle Turner


7. Mother/Android

mother-android.jpg Hulu Release Date: Nov. 5, 2021
Director: Mattson Tomlin
Stars: Chloë Grace Moretz, Algee Smith, Raúl Castillo
Genre: Sci-fi, thriller
Rating: R
Runtime: 110 minutes
Paste Review Score: 5.5

Watch on Hulu

College student Georgia (Chloë Grace Moretz) is halfway through telling her friend that she wants to get an abortion when her world is catapulted into a post-apocalyptic hellscape. The androids-turned-butlers that every family in America seems to have go from charming and subservient to malicious and bloodthirsty, with an automated eye on wiping out the human race. Next thing we know, Georgia is nine months pregnant, and she and her boyfriend Sam (Algee Smith) are terrified and on the run from a homicidal army of cyborgs. This sudden, jarring switch to a life-or-death state is given even more urgency by virtue of the ticking time bomb in Georgia’s uterus. The initial setup of Mattson Tomlin’s feature debut Mother/Android offers two options for the trajectory of the film. One, it’ll explore the nuances of human vs. robot through Georgia’s pregnancy, which is a fascinating conversation that tends to bode well (see A.I.: Artificial Intelligence and Ex Machina). Or, option two: The pregnancy won’t play into the film’s themes at all, and will instead serve as an arbitrary incentive for our protagonists to escape from their assailants. To his detriment, Tomlin chooses the latter. And despite choosing the emotional route, Tomlin doesn’t give us nearly enough emotional weight to cling to. Sadly, Georgia never really amounts to anything beyond a one-dimensional mama bear. Sam similarly isn’t given the material to progress beyond a listless, often misguided provider. They’re a couple whose chemistry is lacking, as is the rationale for us watching them in the first place. Mother/Android works best as a compelling action flick, but its construction leads me to wonder why it even needed to involve robots in the first place. The film never bothers to explain the initial epic software malfunction, nor does it consider questions of humanness, even though our protagonist is literally growing a human child, and the title infers an eventual connection between human and machine. Like its confusing title, Mother/Android never really figures out what it wants to say. —Aurora Amidon


8. Jacinta

jacinta.jpg Hulu Release Date: Oct. 8, 2021
Director: Jessica Earnshaw
Genre: Documentary
Rating: TV-MA
Runtime: 105 minutes

Watch on Hulu

Hulu partnered with ABC News on this documentary following a young woman and the relationship with her mother, as she tries to break the cycle of addiction, crime and punishment. First-time filmmaker Jessica Earnshaw won the Albert Maysles New Documentary Award from the Tribeca Film Festival, and the film was released simultaneously to Hulu and theaters after a robust film-festival circuit.


9. Vacation Friends

vacation-friends.jpg Hulu Release Date: Aug. 27, 2021
Director: Clay Tarver
Stars: John Cena, Lil Rel Howery, Yvonne Orji, Meredith Hagner, Robert Wisdom, Lynn Whitfield, Andrew Bachelor
Genre: Comedy
Rating: R
Runtime: 104 minutes
Paste Review Score: 6.6

Watch on Hulu

Vacations differ for everyone—some people want a relaxing time away from reality with pool days and spa visits, while others want to escape reality completely and let their alter egos take over for a trip filled with debauchery and bad decisions. The new Hulu film Vacation Friends takes the latter to another level. After Marcus (Lil Rel Howery) and Emily’s (Yvonne Orji) romantic trip to Mexico is derailed by a flooded honeymoon suite, the wild couple upstairs, Ron and Kyla (John Cena and Meredith Hagner), offer to house them in their Presidential Suite and quickly coax them into shedding their buttoned-up personas. A few cocaine-rimmed margaritas and a crashed yacht later, the couples are bonded for life (or at least, for the rest of their trip). Back in the real world, Marcus and Emily think they’ll never see Ron and Kyla ever again…until they show up to their Atlanta wedding, baby bump in tow. As these comedies generally are, Vacation Friends is over the top. Cena and Hagner get to have all of the fun as chaotic characters who think extreme pranks are the basis of any good friendship. They don’t have any real backstory to speak of, which adds to the charm of the premise: There are some people you meet and immediately question their entire existence, and Ron and Kyla are just that. We don’t know how they have exorbitant amounts of money or where they live or even what exactly they do for work, but we know that they’re here and they’re ready to have a good time. It’s a fun premise and features some entertaining performances from a talented cast, but ultimately it didn’t live up to the promise of those ingredients. Vacation Friends is a perfectly enjoyable movie to fire up on a cozy Friday night, as long as you don’t expect too much out of it. —Radhika Menon


10. Homeroom

homeroom.jpg Hulu Release Date: Nov. 5, 2021
Director: Peter Nicks
Genre: Documentary
Rating: TV-MA
Runtime: 111 minutes

Watch on Hulu

Homeroom is the final documentary in Peter Nicks’ Oakland trilogy. Following 2012’s The Waiting Room about a safety-net hospital in the city and 2017’s The Force about the attempted reforms to the Oakland Police Department, Homeroom sees Nicks embedded in a public high school during a year that saw the Covid-19 outbreak and George Floyd protests. The film won an award at Sundance last year before its August release on Hulu.