Here Are All of Hillary Clinton's "Misstatements" About Her Email Server, Now in One Convenient Location

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The Associated Press has done yeoman’s work in compiling a long list of Hillary Clinton’s misstatements about her controversial private email server, dating back to March of 2015. This is taken from the inspector general’s report on the matter, which concludes that “Over the months, Hillary Clinton misstated key facts about her use of private email and her own server for her work as secretary of state.” That’s a funny word, “misstatement,” because it almost makes it sound like it’s a slip of the tongue, when in fact the implication is that she lied. Here’s an example of one misstatement:

Clinton: “What I did was allowed. It was allowed by the State Department. The State Department has confirmed that.” — AP interview, September.

The Report: “No evidence” that Clinton asked for or received approval to conduct official government business on a personal email account run through a private server in her New York home. According to top State Department officials interviewed for the investigation, the departments that oversee security “did not — and would not — approve” her use of a personal account because of security concerns.

Clinton has changed her account since the report came out. On Thursday, she told CNN “I thought it was allowed. I knew past secretaries of state used personal email.”

That’s just the beginning—Clinton also “misspoke” about her own availability for interviews on the matter (she declined through a lawyer when push came to shove), how many people at high levels know she was using a private server, and whether there were any security breaches. It’s a fascinating look at a problem that seems to keep getting bigger and bigger for the presumptive nominee. Read the full report here. And be sure to visit Politico for the unconvincing spin her campaign is putting on this new information, calling it a “mistake” that she has already taken responsibility for, and that she didn’t know about in the first place—another misstatement, since the issue had come up in an email exchange as early as 2010.

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