NYFW SS16’s Standout Catwalks

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As the whirlwind of another New York Fashion Week drew to a close, a few runways left palpable aftershocks with their Spring/Summer 2016 contributions. These shows were the perfect blend of theatricality mixed with raw emotion and, of course, a dash of fashion and style. SS16 celebrated a handful of anniversaries and welcomed big news for well-established fashion houses, as well as saw a few newcomers hit their stride. If nothing else, the SS16 shows proved individual style reigns supreme and cookie cutter monotony, for most designers, has officially left the building.

Check out five of NYFW SS16’s best shows where the runway was as much a part of the story as the clothing and models themselves.

1. Thom Browne NY and Kabuki Noir

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A photo posted by Thom Browne (@thombrowneny) on



Thom Browne and his collections have a knack for the theatrical. Each season, Browne brings a new concept to the catwalk well beyond the expected. For SS16, he took a schoolhouse frame and tipped it on its head—literally. The models wore Japanese inspired schoolgirl garb with exaggerated Pippy Longstocking-esque braids. Paired with sinister kabuki makeup, black lipstick and stark, archless brows, Browne's runway was anything but usual. The clothing, the staging and the styling all told a cohesive, exhilarating story of mystery, intrigue and the avant garde.

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A photo posted by Thom Browne (@thombrowneny) on

2. Givenchy Retrospective with Art House Intentions



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A photo posted by GIVENCHY (@givenchyofficial) on



For Givenchy's debut at New York Fashion Week, creative director, Riccardo Tisci, left everything on the catwalk. Seriously. With a star-studded audience, a runway located on a pier with a panorama of ground zero and the Manhattan skyline in the background, as well as enlisting performance artist, Marina Abramovic, as the show's art director, Tisci pulled out all the stops for his ten year anniversary show. Though models slipped and fell, the catwalk was ablaze with a retrospective of Tisci's designs during his tenure with the French fashion house. The finale was met with a standing ovation, and it is safe to say Givenchy's first catwalk for New York Fashion Week stole the show on the second day.

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3. Acid Nightmares by Ammerman Schlösberg



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Design duo Elizabeth Ammerman and Eric Schlösberg are the two halves behind New York newcomer Ammerman Schlösberg. Their aesthetic is undeniably aggressive with club kid connotations, neon visions of sugar plum fairies and unexpected mashups. For SS16, the twosome described their collection as if Marica Brady tried LSD and went down the rabbit hole as they say. With tear stained makeup, sequins, middle parts and, of course, bellbottoms, this installation was chock full of vivid imagery akin to a Rob Zombie film. With layers of grit contrasted by the design team's signature bold color choices, it would seem Marica's first experience with acid was indeed a trip to say the least.

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4. Coach's Little House on the Prairie



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A photo posted by coach (@coach) on



For Coach's first ever runway show, creative director, Stuart Vevers, went above and beyond with his catwalk vision. Drawing inspiration from Midwestern prairie appeal: floral patterns, camel and warm amber leathers, as well as utilizing New York's High Line as his backdrop, complete with tall grass and a stunning view of where the Coach's newest headquarters will be, this line was a textural and vibrant expression of Coach's youthful reinvention. With new saddle bags and statement pullovers, this show was an absolutely stunning debut for a company celebrating its 75th anniversary.

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A photo posted by coach (@coach) on

5. Jeremy Scott's Swinging Sixties Sassy Tarts



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Self-described as the people's designer, Jeremy Scott has a tendency to inspire either adoration or revulsion. His clothing pushes the boundaries of taste yet there is no denying his shows are one of a kind. This season, Scott's glamazons stomped their way down a sparse runway but the bare catwalk was balanced by the models top-heavy, bouffant hairdos and neon color palette. With mod inspirations, Bond girl vivacity and a touch K-pop cartoon, Scott put on a show chock full of genuine energy and excitement just bright enough to take over Instagram feeds everywhere.

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