Exclusive: Watch an Elephant Adapt to Scarcity in a Triumphant Seven Worlds, One Planet Clip

TV Features Seven Worlds, One Planet
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Exclusive: Watch an Elephant Adapt to Scarcity in a Triumphant <i>Seven Worlds, One Planet</i> Clip

The excellent documentary series Seven Worlds, One Planet is coming to a close this week with an episode focused on Africa. It’s been a moving journey across our planet, investigating the flora and fauna that we are tasked with protecting. So if you aren’t caught up, now is the time!

In our exclusive clip from this final episode, we see an elephant adapting to scarcity by balancing itself on its hind legs—a feat, narrator David Attenborough tells us, that requires “monumental effort,” as the elephants can weigh over five tons. Referred to as a gentle giant, this elephant’s work to bring the tree’s leaves down to his level also helps other animals around him. It’s triumphant and beautiful.

But, the episode will also feature some more difficult truths, including the imminent extinction of the white rhinoceros, an animal whose numbers have been incredibly depleted because of poaching. On the lighter side, though, we’ll also get to see a baby chimpanzee being taught to use a tool to crack open nuts, and observe cheetahs stalking their prey across the savanna. Don’t miss it! (Or don’t forget to catch up—an elephant never forgets!!)

Check out the video below; the fascinating Seven Worlds, One Planet airs Saturday nights on BBC America:

Following Emmy®-winning series Planet Earth II and Blue Planet II, Seven Worlds, One Planet tells the story of earth’s seven spectacular continents and how they shape the extraordinary animal behavior and biodiversity we see today. Narrated by Sir David Attenborough, and featuring a theme co-composed by Hans Zimmer and Jacob Shea, and series score by Jacob Shea for Bleeding Fingers Music, Seven Worlds, One Planet reveals how each distinct continent has shaped the unique animal life found there.

Seven Worlds, One Planet features filming firsts including polar bears jumping from rocks to catch adult beluga whales and a firefly spectacle in North America captured with a motion control tracking time-lapse camera, puma successfully hunting adult guanaco in South America, spidaboo mating dance in Australia, grave robbing hamsters in Europe, the largest aggregation of great whales ever filmed in Antarctica and Sir David Attenborough with the last two northern white rhinos on Earth in Africa. In addition, the filmmakers have employed new technology, including 8K cameras and boundary-defining drone techniques, to capture unique perspectives, new species, and animal behavior filming firsts.



Allison Keene is the TV Editor of Paste Magazine. For more television talk, pop culture chat and general japery, you can follow her @keeneTV

For all the latest TV news, reviews, lists and features, follow @Paste_TV.

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