Get an Exclusive Peek at Queer Coming-of-Age Comic Luisa: Now and Then

Cartoonist Carole Maurel’s Transformative Tale Hits Shelves This Week, Adapted by Mariko Tamaki

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Get an Exclusive Peek at Queer Coming-of-Age Comic <i>Luisa: Now and Then</i>

For more than four decades, Humanoids has served as the premiere publisher for Europe’s best (and weirdest) science fiction and fantasy, with names like Moebius, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Juan Gimenez, Milo Manara and Christophe Bec populating their impressive catalogue. This spring, Humanoids launched its Life Drawn imprint, which reveals an entirely different side to the publisher. Timed with Humanoids’ 20th anniversary of publishing in the United States, Life Drawn is, in the words of publisher Fabrice Giger, “grounded in life here on earth, not just out among the stars. Stories that explore inner space, not outer galaxies. Stories that bring out the human in Humanoids.”

This week, Life Drawn publishes French cartoonist Carole Maurel’s Luisa: Now and Then, which has been adapted into English by award-winning creator Mariko Tamaki (This One Summer, Supergirl: Being Super). Luisa tackles familiar queer coming-of-age themes with a time-travel device that makes it perfectly suited to the comic medium. Maurel also covers uncommon territory via the older Luisa, who must reconsider her identity on the cusp of middle age. Check out an exclusive preview of Luisa: Now and Then below, and be sure to check out the graphic novel digitally and in fine comic book stores this Wednesday.

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Luisa: Now and Then Cover Art by Carole Maurel

Luisa: Now and Then
Writer/Artist: Carole Maurel
Adapted By: Mariko Tamaki
Publisher: Life Drawn/ Humanoids
A disillusioned photographer has a chance encounter with her lost teenage self who has miraculously traveled into the future. Together, both women ultimately discover who they really are, finding the courage to live life by being true to themselves. Luisa’s sexuality is revealed to be a defining element of her identity, one which both of her selves must come to terms with. A time-traveling love story that turns coming-of-age conventions upside down, Luisa is a universal queer romance for the modern age.

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Luisa: Now and Then Interior Art by Carole Maurel

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Luisa: Now and Then Interior Art by Carole Maurel

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Luisa: Now and Then Interior Art by Carole Maurel

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Luisa: Now and Then Interior Art by Carole Maurel

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Luisa: Now and Then Interior Art by Carole Maurel

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